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Shots - Health News
5:32 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

CDC Investigates Live Anthrax Shipments

A security fence surrounds the main part of the U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Ground, a testing laboratory in the Utah desert. The Army says it mistakenly shipped live anthrax from Dugway to several labs in the U.S. and Korea.
George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 6:15 pm

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is still trying to figure out how the military managed to ship anthrax spores that were apparently live from one of its facilities to more than a dozen labs across the United States.

"We have a team at the [military] lab to determine what may have led to this incident," says CDC spokesman Jason McDonald. In addition, he says, the agency is working with health officials in nine states to make sure the potentially live samples are safely disposed of and the labs affected are decontaminated.

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All Tech Considered
5:25 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Blind Auditions Could Give Employers A Better Hiring Sense

In the face-to-face interview process, research shows that managers tend to hire applicants who are similar to them on paper.
Bjorn Rune Lie Getty Images/Ikon Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 6:15 pm

Entrepreneur Petar Vujosevic was just a regular guy who saw a big problem with the way the hiring system works.

Typically, a hiring manager posts an opening, describes the ideal candidate and resumes come flooding in. After doing some interviews, the manager has to make a gut decision: Who is the best person for the job?

Research shows that more often than not, managers pick someone whose background is similar to theirs.

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National Security
5:23 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Foreign Policy Experts Weigh In On U.S. Strategy Against The Islamic State

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 6:15 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Salt
5:23 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Why A Journalist Scammed The Media Into Spreading Bad Chocolate Science

Eating a chocolate bar daily can help you lose weight? Sorry, that study was a sweet lie — part of an elaborate hoax to school the news media about proper nutrition science journalism.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 6:17 pm

Earlier this spring, headlines around the world trumpeted an exciting bit of news that seemed too good to be true: "Eating that bar of chocolate can HELP you lose weight," as Britain's Daily Mail put it.

From India to Australia and Texas to Germany, news organizations shared findings published in the International Archives of Medicine in late March.

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The Two-Way
5:18 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

FCC Chairman Wants To Help Low Income Americans Afford Broadband

A government program called Lifeline subsidizes basic phone service for low-income people. Now, the head of the Federal Communications Commission also wants to use the program to pay for broadband Internet connections, which many poor people lack.

When it comes to the Internet, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler says there are the haves and the have nots. Ninety-five percent of households with incomes over $150,000 a year have broadband access, he says. But just 48 percent of households making under $25,000 do.

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It's All Politics
4:33 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Drug Overdose, On The Rise, Cropping Up As Campaign Issue

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie participated in a roundtable discussion at the Farnum Center in Manchester, N.H. earlier this month.
Jim Cole AP

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 5:49 pm

As presidential candidates visit the early caucus and primary states of Iowa and New Hampshire, they're hearing about heroin and meth. Drug overdoses now kill more Americans than traffic accidents. And, in many places, there's a growing acceptance that this isn't just a problem for other people.

New Hampshire is in the throes of a crisis. Last year more than 300 people in the small state died of drug overdoses. Mostly opiods like oxycontin and heroin.

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Shots - Health News
4:24 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

What We Know About Tattoo Reactions Only Goes Skin-Deep

A tattoo that starts as a personal statement can sometimes have medical consequences.
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

For about as long as there have been humans, it seems there have been tattoos.

Ötzi the Iceman, the 5,000-year-old mummy discovered in the Alps in 1991, had 61 tattoos covering his body. And a quick look around the local coffee shop reveals they're just about as popular today. By one estimate, about a quarter of U.S. adults have at least one tattoo.

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Parallels
4:06 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Does Less Latin Mean Dumbing Down? France Debates School Reform

Striking French teachers hold a German flag as they take part in a nationwide protest against new measures aimed at revamping the country's school system, in Marseille, France, on May 19. France's 840,000 teachers are largely opposed to the reform, their unions say, fearing it will increase competition between schools and exacerbate inequalities.
Jean-Paul Pelissier Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 6:15 pm

Reforming the education system in any country can be tricky. But in France, where learning is highly centralized and public school (l'ecole de la Republique) a symbol of French greatness, it's all but impossible.

Several French presidents have tried and failed. President Francois Hollande's second attempt has traditionalists up in arms and critics on the right and left screaming that French schools are being dumbed down.

Teachers, students and some parents took to the streets of cities across the country recently to denounce the government's project.

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Goats and Soda
3:46 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Smartphones Are So Smart They Can Now Test Your Vision

A new smartphone app gives a close-up view of a patient's eye.
Screengrab from video by Peek Vision, produced in collaboration with Sony Mobile.

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 4:07 pm

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Movie Interviews
2:36 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

David Oyelowo On Acting, His Royal Roots And The One Role He Won't Take

David Oyelowo plays an American Army veteran living with his mother in HBO's Nightingale.
HBO

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 4:33 pm

If actor David Oyelowo projects a regal air, it's one he comes by naturally. Born in England to Nigerian parents, Oyelowo's father had always told him that theirs was a royal family, a claim the actor initially discounted.

"I was like, 'Yeah, whatever,' " Oyelowo tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. But then the family moved back to Nigeria where they lived on a street named after his family and the actor realized that his father had not been joking.

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Code Switch
12:23 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Not Your Mother's Catholic Frescoes: Radiant Portraits Of Queer People Of Color

Photographer Gabriel Garcia Roman's "Queer Icons" series portrays queer people of color as saints and warriors. Jahmal Golden is a poet and a student at The New School.
Courtesy of Gabriel Garcia Roman

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 4:06 pm

Photographer Gabriel Garcia Roman's portraits feature friends and acquaintances, activists and poets, Americans and immigrants — some naturalized, some undocumented.

All of them are queer people of color.

"I wanted to specifically focus on this community because queer and trans people of color are so rarely represented in the art world," says Roman, who is Mexican-American and also identifies as queer.

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The Two-Way
12:19 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

'Trigger Mortis': New Bond Novel Brings Back Pussy Galore

A return to Pussy Galore's golden days: Honor Blackman, who played the character on screen in Goldfinger, poses with the original Bond, Sean Connery.
Express/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 5:37 pm

What kind of birthday gift do you get a man who has everything? It's a well-worn riddle — and one that gets all the more difficult if the man in question happens to have died a half-century ago.

Luckily for Ian Fleming, today's 107-year-old birthday boy and the creator of James Bond, novelist Anthony Horowitz knows just the gift: a reunion with an old friend.

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The Two-Way
11:52 am
Thu May 28, 2015

FIFA President Blatter: Bribery Scandal Puts 'Long Shadow' Over Soccer

FIFA President Sepp Blatter addresses the audience at the opening ceremony of the 65th FIFA Congress in Zurich on Thursday. The leader of soccer's governing body has rejected calls to resign.
Arnd Wiegmann Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 4:18 pm

Embattled FIFA President Sepp Blatter is speaking at the beginning of the 65th Congress of soccer's worldwide governing body. Blatter faces a re-election vote Friday, in the face of new corruption and bribery charges against senior members of FIFA.

"These are unprecedented and difficult times for FIFA," Blatter said. "The events of yesterday have cast a long shadow over football and over this league's congress."

It was a somber opening to FIFA's meeting of international sporting bodies, an assembly that was celebrated with flag-bearers and other pageantry.

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Shots - Health News
11:51 am
Thu May 28, 2015

Depression Treatments Inspired By Club Drug Move Ahead In Tests

Experimental medicines related to ketamine, an anesthetic and club drug, are making progress in clinical tests.
Wikipedia

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 2:35 pm

Antidepressant drugs that work in hours instead of weeks could be on the market within three years, researchers say.

"We're getting closer and closer to having really, truly next-generation treatments that are better and quicker than existing ones," says Dr. Carlos Zarate, a researcher at the National Institute of Mental Health.

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NPR History Dept.
11:50 am
Thu May 28, 2015

The Windshield-Pitting Mystery Of 1954

A man shows his pitted windshield to a police officer in Seattle in 1954
Museum of History & Industry, Seattle Post- Intelligencer Collection, 1986.5.571.1

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 3:34 pm

The nationwide weirdness that was the Windshield-Pitting Mystery began in the spring of 1954. Looking back at the events today may give us a window — OK, a windshield — on the makeup and the mindset of mid-20th-century America.

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The Two-Way
11:04 am
Thu May 28, 2015

NOAA Warns Of Powerful Storms, Despite Seeing 'Below-Normal' Hurricane Season

A graphic shows NOAA's prediction of between six and 11 named storms in the upcoming Atlantic hurricane season.
NOAA

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 1:44 pm

Even though its predictions call for a below-normal Atlantic hurricane season with six to 11 named storms this year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says strong and devastating storms remain a possibility.

From NOAA:

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The Two-Way
9:38 am
Thu May 28, 2015

FIFA Update: Europe's UEFA Backs Blatter's Opponent; Raids In Brazil

UEFA President Michel Platini says his organization is backing FIFA President Sepp Blatter's opponent in Friday's presidential election. When asked if UEFA might consider leaving FIFA, Platini said, "Of course."
FABRICE COFFRINI AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 1:27 pm

One day after a string of bribery arrests and indictments was revealed to center on FIFA, the soccer organization's president, Sepp Blatter, says he will not resign. Accusations of rampant corruption at FIFA came just days before Blatter stands for reelection in Switzerland Friday.

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It's All Politics
9:09 am
Thu May 28, 2015

5 Things You Should Know About George Pataki

Former New York Gov. George Pataki speaks during the Iowa Agriculture Summit in March.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 1:18 pm

This post has been updated to reflect that Pataki is officially running.

George Pataki announced his presidential candidacy in Exeter, N.H., on Thursday. He's the eighth official Republican entrant in the 2016 race for the White House. The field is expected to double over the next couple of months. Pataki has made numerous visits and a few friends in recent months in the Granite State, home of the first primary in 2016. Still, the mention of his name in most of the country might prompt questions of, "Who?" and possibly, "Why?"

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Code Switch
9:00 am
Thu May 28, 2015

The Worst Kind Of Groundhog Day: Let's Talk (Again) About Diversity In Publishing

This summer brings many excellent books from writers of color.
Ariel Zambelich NPR

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 11:57 am

Another day, another all-white list of recommended reading. This year's New York Times summer reading list, compiled annually by Times literary critic Janet Maslin, offered up zero books by non-white authors.

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The Two-Way
8:20 am
Thu May 28, 2015

George Pataki Announces 2016 Presidential Bid

Former New York Gov. George Pataki, seen here speaking in Iowa recently, is announcing his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination in 2016.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 5:20 pm

Updated at 12:33 p.m. ET

Former New York Gov. George Pataki is adding his name to the list of Republicans running for their party's 2016 presidential nomination.

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The Two-Way
7:12 am
Thu May 28, 2015

Live Anthrax Was Mistakenly Sent To 9 States And A U.S. Military Base

Dugway Proving Ground military base, seen here in 2010, was the source of several anthrax shipments that are suspected of containing live samples of the disease.
Jim Urquhart AP

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 12:36 pm

The Department of Defense says an attempt to ship inactive anthrax samples resulted in live samples being sent to labs in nine U.S. states and to a U.S. Air Force base in South Korea.

Fears of exposure to the potentially deadly disease prompted officials to advise four civilian workers to get preventive care; more than 20 military personnel are also being monitored. The samples were sent via commercial shipping companies, but the Pentagon says there is "no known risk to the general public."

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Thu May 28, 2015

Nonacademic Skills Are Key To Success. But What Should We Call Them?

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 2:32 pm

More and more people in education agree on the importance of learning stuff other than academics.

But no one agrees on what to call that "stuff".

There are least seven major overlapping terms in play. New ones are being coined all the time. This bagginess bugs me, as a member of the education media. It bugs researchers and policymakers too.

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Politics
5:01 am
Thu May 28, 2015

The Future President Will Need To Wrestle With Debt From The Past

While annual deficits have shrunk dramatically since the depths of the Great Recession, the federal government is still adding to its overall debt.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 5:11 pm

Our next president is likely to have some big plans for the future of the country. But he or she will also have to wrestle with some leftover bills from the past. The federal government has issued trillions of dollars in IOUs. Just the interest on that massive debt could be a serious constraint for the next president.

That's why Danette Kenne has some questions for the presidential candidates about what kind of budget they plan to present to Congress.

"Being in Iowa, one of the things we can do is ask questions," Kenne said.

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It's All Politics
5:01 am
Thu May 28, 2015

Are Black Voters Ready For Hillary Clinton?

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton speaks with Frederic Hunt, a minister at First Calvary Baptist Church, during a campaign stop Wednesday at The Main Street Bakery in Columbia, S.C.
Richard Shiro AP

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 9:51 am

Hillary Clinton will need black voters if she wants to win the Democratic nomination and the presidency next year. But African American voters were a major reason she lost the early nominating state of South Carolina to Barack Obama by nearly 30 points in 2008.

She's trying to make up for it this time around.

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Goats and Soda
3:30 am
Thu May 28, 2015

How The World's Largest Refugee Camp Remade A Generation Of Somalis

Somali children dance in the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya.
Fairfax Media Fairfax Media via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 4:38 pm

The world's largest refugee camp is also a giant social experiment.

Take hundreds of thousands of Somalis fleeing a war. Shelter them for 24 years in a camp in Kenya run by the United Nations. And offer different opportunities than they might have had if they'd stayed in Somalia.

The Kenyan government wants the experiment to end — soon. It's pushing the refugees to return to their home in Somalia, though the camp called Dadaab is the only home many have known.

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Book News & Features
3:29 am
Thu May 28, 2015

Technology Of Books Has Changed, But Bookstores Are Hanging In There

Capitol Hill Books owner Jim Toole runs the front register of his used bookstore several days a week. He has banned several words from his store, including "awesome," "perfect" and "Amazon."
Ariel Zambelich NPR

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 12:59 pm

If the book is dead, nobody bothered to tell the folks at Capitol Hill Books in Washington, D.C. Books of every size, shape and genre occupy each square inch of the converted row house — including the bathroom — all arranged in an order discernible only to the mind of Jim Toole, the store's endearingly grouchy owner.

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The Two-Way
1:02 am
Thu May 28, 2015

Golden State Beats Houston, Will Face Cleveland For NBA Title

Stephen Curry of the Golden State Warriors drives on James Harden of the Houston Rockets in the second half of the Warrior's series-clinching win Wednesday night in Oakland, Calif.
Ezra Shaw Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 2:36 am

The Golden State Warriors managed to dominate a stacked Western Conference all season long; with Wednesday night's 104-90 win over the Houston Rockets, they'll get a chance to finish the job in the NBA Finals.

The Warriors got a team-leading 26 points from star point guard Stephen Curry, who had struck his head in a fall in the previous game on Monday. Curry's shot wasn't as accurate as usual, but he made up for it with steals, rebounds and free throws. Harrison Barnes added 24 points for Golden State and Klay Thompson added 20.

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The Two-Way
7:49 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

Danish Broadcaster Says Killing Of Rabbit On Air Highlighted Hypocrisy

This rabbit wasn't the one killed in Denmark.
Dean Fosdick AP

A Danish radio station says a host who killed a 9-week-old rabbit during a live debate on animal welfare and later cooked and ate it wanted to "stir a debate about the hypocrisy when it comes to perceptions of cruelty towards animals." But not everyone is buying that argument amid demands for Asger Juhl, the host, to be fired for "shameless self-promotion."

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Business
6:20 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

On The Road To Recovery, Detroit's Property Taxes Aren't Helping

Detroit is attracting entrepreneurs who like the relatively cheap workspaces. But real estate developers and business owners like Sean Harrington, who turned the Iodent Building into an apartment complex, are paying the price in property taxes.
Jason Margolis NPR

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 8:45 am

With new businesses sprouting up left and right, there's a lot of talk these days about Detroit being on the comeback trail.

A great thing about the city is that it's easy to become a real estate mogul. But some entrepreneurs might have reason to pause.

A new study released Tuesday shows that Detroit's commercial property taxes are the highest of any city in the nation.

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Music Interviews
6:08 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

When This 9-Year-Old Pianist Plays, He Feels The Music

Oscar Paz Suaznabar started playing keyboard by ear when he was just 2. The now 9-year-old pianist has played at Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center.
Courtesy Oscar Paz Suaznabar

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 8:16 pm

When Oscar Paz Suaznabar plays the piano, he does so with feeling.

The Alexandria, Va., resident has played at Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center and on the NPR show From the Top. He is 9 years old.

Oscar started playing his older sister's keyboard by ear when he was just 2. The sorrow he conveys when he plays "The Lark" by Russian composer Mikhail Glinka is drawn from the kind of loss any 9-year-old can understand.

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