All Things Considered

Weekdays 4 p.m. on WABE's Live Stream; Saturday at 5 p.m. and Sunday at 6 p.m. on WABE News

In-depth reporting has transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every day, hear breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews and special — sometimes quirky — features.

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All Tech Considered
6:36 pm
Mon June 29, 2015

Apple Bets Big That You'll Start Paying To Stream Music

Apple's senior vice president of Internet Software and Services Eddy Cue speaks about Apple Music during the keynote at the annual developers conference.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 7:09 pm

Spotify, Google Play, Amazon Prime, Rdio, Rhapsody, Pandora — the list of streaming music service goes on and on. On Tuesday, Apple joins that lineup with the launch of its streaming service, Apple Music. Apple will give consumers a three-month trial, and then it will charge $9.99 a month.

But most music lovers still aren't sure why they should pay. Colin Barrett, 31, has tried a few of the streaming services, but he doesn't use them anymore.

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Parallels
6:36 pm
Mon June 29, 2015

Greeks Brace For The Fallout As Deadline Looms

A Greek demonstrator urges a "no" vote in Sunday's referendum on whether Greece should accept international demands for additional financial austerity. He is holding an old 1,000 Greek drachma bank note during a rally in the northern Greek port city of Thessaloniki on Monday. Some Greeks say the country should leave the eurozone and go back to the drachma.
Giannis Papanikos AP

Giorgos Koronis is welcoming tourists from the U.S. and England at the old Olympic Stadium in Athens, where the first modern Olympics were held in 1896.

Koronis, 50, has worked for the state for 25 years, mainly at ticket counters at various tourist sites around the Greek capital. But today he's struggling to smile.

He spent Monday morning at the ATM in line with a few retirees from his neighborhood, including his mother.

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It's All Politics
6:32 pm
Mon June 29, 2015

Lethal Injection Ruling Draws Out Justices' Passionate Opinions

In dissent, Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote that under the majority's reasoning it would not matter if the prisoner was being "drawn and quartered, slowly tortured to death, or actually burned at the stake," as long as there was no more humane method of execution available. Justice Antonin Scalia orally rebutted Justice Stephen Breyer's dissent, calling it "gobbledygook."
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 7:02 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday dealt a major blow to death penalty opponents, upholding the use of a controversial drug as part of a three-drug execution cocktail. The vote was 5-4, with unusually passionate and sometimes bitter opinions from the majority and dissenting justices.

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Music Interviews
6:48 pm
Sun June 28, 2015

The Sound Of Twin Danger: Frank Sinatra Meets The Clash

Twin Danger's Vanessa Bley and Stuart Matthewman
Sunny Khalsa Courtesy of the artist

Cocktail jazz isn't a sound you hear very much in pop music these days. But a duo known as Twin Danger is causing a scene with their self-titled debut album and live shows.

It's a familiar mood for saxophonist Stuart Matthewman; he co-wrote many of the biggest hits for Sade, like "No Ordinary Love" and "Your Love Is King."

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Governing
5:36 pm
Sat June 27, 2015

For Families Of U.S. Hostages, New Policy May Bring New Hope

Linda Boyle (left) and Lyn Coleman hold a photo of their children, who were kidnapped in Afghanistan in 2012. Caitlan Coleman, an American married to Canadian Joshua Boyle, was pregnant when the couple was abducted.
Bill Gorman AP

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 6:36 pm

More than 80 Americans have been taken hostage abroad since Sept. 11, 2001. Currently, 30 Americans are being held around the world.

Until this week, the families of those hostages would have faced the threat of prosecution from the U.S. government for trying to pay a ransom to kidnappers.

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Book News & Features
5:26 pm
Sat June 27, 2015

Marvel's Half-Black, Half-Latino Spider-Man Is Going Mainstream

Marvel has put half-African-American, half-Latino teen Miles Morales in the Spider-Man suit.
Courtesy of Marvel

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 6:36 pm

Step aside, Peter Parker: There's a new Spider-Man joining the Marvel Universe.

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Law
7:00 pm
Fri June 26, 2015

Supreme Court Changes Face Of Marriage In Historic Ruling

Gay rights advocates John Lewis (left), and his spouse Stuart Gaffney kiss across the street from City Hall in San Francisco, on Friday following a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that same-sex couples have the right to marry nationwide.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 9:32 am

In a historic ruling Friday, the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court declared marriage a fundamental constitutional right not just for opposite-sex couples, but for same-sex couples too.

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It's All Politics
7:17 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Supreme Court Thwarts Efforts To Put Obamacare On Life Support

At the heart of the case ruled on by the Supreme Court Thursday are the exchanges where people go online to shop for individual insurance.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 5:09 am

The U.S. Supreme Court handed the Obama administration a sweeping victory on Thursday, upholding the nationwide subsidies that are crucial to the president's health care law. By a 6-3 vote, the high court ruled that Congress meant all three major provisions of the law to apply to all states and to work in tandem.

The ruling was the court's second decision upholding the Affordable Care Act — three years ago, it upheld the law as constitutional.

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Parallels
5:50 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

U.S. Army Begins Training Ukrainian Soldiers

Ukrainian national guardsmen practice protecting and recovering wounded comrades as American military trainers watch.
Corey Flintoff NPR

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 3:11 pm

Fighting surged again this week in eastern Ukraine, where government troops are battling separatist militias and their Russian allies.

NATO is responding by sending troops and equipment to eastern Europe, and it's also giving defensive training to Ukraine's beleaguered army.

First, you need to know how bad things were for the Ukrainian army when separatist militias and their Russian allies began the fight in eastern Ukraine in April 2014.

Miroslav Gai volunteered for the army last winter.

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Parallels
5:37 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

For Poland's Gay Community, A Shift In Public Attitudes, If Not Laws

Marchers carried a multicolor flag during Warsaw's annual gay pride parade earlier this month. Poland prohibits gay marriage but activists say attitudes toward gays have improved in recent years.
Alik Keplicz AP

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 7:17 pm

Around the world, gay marriage is allowed in more than 20 countries. Many European Union nations are enhancing rights for their gay, bisexual and transgender citizens. But Catholic Poland isn't one of them.

This former Soviet satellite constitutionally restricts marriage to a man and a woman. Recent efforts to pass laws to protect the LGBT community in Poland from discrimination and violence have gone nowhere.

But there is one notable change these days — in Polish attitudes.

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Goats and Soda
4:37 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

The Cycling World May Soon Bow Down Before Nairo Quintana

Colombian cyclist Nairo Quintana poses for a snapshot during a training session this month in Colombia.
LUIS ACOSTA AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 7:17 pm

He began biking to get to high school. The return trip was a 10-mile uphill slog. That didn't deter Nairo Quintana. Sometimes he'd even attach a cable to his sister's bike and haul her up the mountain with him.

And now some pundits think that the 25-year-old Colombian athlete could win the grueling, three-week Tour de France, which kicks off on July 4.

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Around the Nation
6:33 pm
Wed June 24, 2015

Texas Abortion Curbs Go Into Effect Soon, Unless Supreme Court Acts

On July 9, 2013, opponents and supporters of a bill to put restrictions on abortion hold signs near a news conference outside the Texas Capitol in Austin. The bill was passed, but has been battled in the courts for two years; now, the law is set to go into effect July 1.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Wed June 24, 2015 8:01 pm

At the hands of the Texas Legislature, the last four years have been long for supporters of abortion rights.

The next blow lands on July 1, when a new law will go into effect in Texas and drastically reduce access to abortion services — likely leaving just nine clinics that perform abortions open in the entire state.

The controversial law, passed in 2013, requires clinics to meet tougher building standards and doctors to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital.

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The Two-Way
4:40 pm
Wed June 24, 2015

OSHA Launches Program To Protect Nursing Employees

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 11:20 am

The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will announce Thursday that it's going to crack down on hospitals, for the first time ever, to prevent an epidemic of back and arm injuries among nursing employees.

Nurses and nursing assistants suffer more of those debilitating injuries than any other occupation, and those injuries are caused mainly by moving and lifting patients.

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NPR Ed
5:57 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

A Recipe For Success With Two Student Groups That Often Struggle

Lannie Castagne teaches first grade at Brimley Elementary School. She does monthly reading assessments to make sure her students are on track.
Jennifer Guerra/Michigan Public Radio

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 8:56 pm

In Michigan's Upper Peninsula, Brimley is the kind of small town where the students of the month in the elementary school get full-page write-ups in the local newspaper.

There's an Indian reservation just up the road, a couple bars, a gas station, a motel and that's about it.

Brimley Elementary serves two groups that often struggle academically. Of the 300 students, more than half are Native American. Many come from low-income families.

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Television
6:18 pm
Sun June 21, 2015

The Human Drama Of Hacking Fuels TV Thriller 'Mr. Robot'

USA's Mr. Robot tells the story of a cyber-security engineer and vigilant hacker (played by Rami Malek) who also suffers from anxiety.
Sarah Shatz USA Network

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 10:13 am

Cyborgs and androids are nowhere to be seen in the new USA show Mr. Robot. Instead, the drama is centered on a very human interior — the mind of Elliot, the unlikely hacker hero. From his first words — "Hello, friend" — his voice-over keeps audiences squarely inside his world.

"Elliot is sort of an internal, isolated guy who can't really interact with people socially, in real life, but online he can hack them and knows all the intimate, private details of them," Sam Esmail, the show's creator and executive producer, tells NPR's Arun Rath.

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Environment
6:42 pm
Sat June 20, 2015

Residents Fight To Block Fracked Gas In New York's Finger Lakes

At an October protest, hundreds of "We Are Seneca Lake" members block the gates of Crestwood Midstream to protest against the expansion of fracked gas storage in the Finger Lakes.
PR Newswire AP

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 6:45 pm

New York state's Seneca Lake is the heart of the Finger Lakes, a beautiful countryside of steep glacier-carved hills and long slivers of water with deep beds of salt. It's been mined on Seneca's shore for more than a century.

The Texas company Crestwood Midstream owns the mine now, and stores natural gas in the emptied-out caverns. It has federal approval to increase the amount, and it's seeking New York's OK to store 88 million gallons of propane as well.

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World
5:31 pm
Sat June 20, 2015

Europe's Migrant Crisis Spreads Ashore As Refugees Enter Bulgaria On Foot

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 6:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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On Aging
5:31 pm
Sat June 20, 2015

An Award To New England's Elderly Is Not Always Cause For Celebration

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 6:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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U.S.
5:31 pm
Sat June 20, 2015

Charleston Church To Hold Sunday Service And Deliver 'Message Of Hope'

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 8:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's All Politics
6:13 pm
Fri June 19, 2015

Predictably, Democrats, Republicans Don't Agree On Charleston Causes, Solutions

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., speaks to members of the media after visiting the memorial site at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C., where nine people were killed.
John Taggart EPA/Landov

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 8:42 pm

This post was updated at 6:13 p.m. ET

When tragedies happen, like the shooting in Charleston, they usually find their way into the realm of politics eventually.

This time is no different, as Democrats and Republicans are finding very different ways of talking about what happened in South Carolina. Democrats see race and gun control as issues at the center of it. Republicans, on the other hand, largely point to mental illness and label what happened a tragic but random act.

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Around the Nation
5:51 pm
Fri June 19, 2015

Dylann Roof Said He Wanted To Start A Race War, Friends Say

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 8:13 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The suspected shooter, Dylann Roof, is from Lexington, S.C., near the state capital, Columbia. New York Times reporter Frances Robles has been talking with people there who know Dylann Roof. And, Frances, what's the portrait that you're hearing?

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Around the Nation
5:51 pm
Fri June 19, 2015

Charleston, S.C., Residents Gather Outside Church To Mourn Victims

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 8:13 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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All Tech Considered
6:20 pm
Wed June 17, 2015

As Fitbit Goes Public, It Will Have To Outrun Competition

Fitbit stock begins trading publicly Thursday. The Fitbit Force is shown at the 2014 International CES, the consumer technology trade show, in Las Vegas.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 6:51 pm

Fitness trackers — the wristbands or watches you can wear to track your heart rate, steps, sleep — are getting a shot in the arm. The most popular brand, Fitbit, is going public on Thursday. It's the first startup in the burgeoning wearable tracker industry to begin trading on Wall Street. It plans to raise more than $600 million.

Fitbit recently got a shout out, sort of.

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It's All Politics
6:17 pm
Mon June 15, 2015

High Court Sides With Government On Spousal Visa Denial

Fauzia Din came to the United States as a refugee from Afghanistan in 2000, and later petitioned for an immigrant visa for her husband. The Supreme Court concluded a consular officer was justified in citing unspecified "terrorist activities" in denying that visa.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 7:21 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday upheld the government's broad discretion to give only a cursory explanation for refusing to grant a visa to the spouse of an American citizen. The justices divided 5-to-4, concluding that a consular officer's citation of unspecified "terrorist activities" was enough to justify barring a spouse without further explanation.

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U.S.
6:08 pm
Mon June 15, 2015

Endangered Species Protections At Center Of Drought Debate

The sun sets over the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta near Rio Vista, Calif., in 2013. The delta is the largest West Coast estuary and a source of conflict over the state's water.
Robert Galbraith Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 18, 2015 2:23 pm

Travel up and down California farm country, the Central Valley, and you hardly hear people lamenting the lack of rain or how dry this past winter was. What you hear, from the agriculture industry and many local and national politicians, are sentiments like those expressed by Rep. Devin Nunes:

"Well, what I always like to say is that this is a man-made drought created by government," the Central Valley Republican says.

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All Tech Considered
6:08 pm
Mon June 15, 2015

Theft Of Social Security Numbers Is Broader Than You Might Think

A surprising number of Social Security numbers have been stolen, and that number keeps rising.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 6:33 pm

As cyberattacks continue, analysts are seeing a new pattern: Hackers are focused on stealing personally identifiable information. That includes the security clearances of U.S. intelligence officers, with the reported theft of background information. It also includes information that's less sensitive but far-reaching — like Social Security numbers.

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Author Interviews
6:27 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

'You Couldn't Make This Stuff Up': Inside The Lives Of The 'China Rich'

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 1:06 pm

In his 2014 novel Crazy Rich Asians, author Kevin Kwan took readers to Singapore and into the lives of Asia's elite, who live in a world of opulence so extreme, it's absurd.

The novel became an international best-seller, with a movie in the works.

Now those Crazy Rich Asians are back as a mix of old and new characters in Kwan's new novel, China Rich Girlfriend.

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Health
6:14 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

'Man With The Golden Arm' Donates Blood That Has Saved 2 Million Babies

James Harrison was recognized in 2003 with the Guinness World Record for the most blood donated by one person.
DAVID GRAY Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 11:20 am

When James Harrison was 14, he got really sick. One of his lungs had to be removed, and he needed a lot of blood.

"I was in the hospital for three months and I had 100 stitches," he recalls.

After receiving 13 units — almost 2 gallons — of donated blood, Harrison knew right away that he wanted to give back.

"I was always looking forward to donating, right from the operation, because I don't know how many people it took to save my life," he says. "I never met them, didn't know them."

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Europe
5:30 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

With Tensions Rising, Poland Erects Observation Towers On Russian Border

Unmanned observation towers, funded by the European Union, have sprouted recently along Poland's border with Russia. This one is located outside the sleepy Polish border village of Parkoszewo.
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson NPR

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 10:57 am

Like most former Soviet satellites, Poland has grown very suspicious of Russian intentions since the Kremlin annexed Crimea last year. Poles living near the 180-mile border their country shares with Russia became especially wary after their government, among others, accused Moscow of deploying nuclear-capable Iskander missiles in Kaliningrad.

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Author Interviews
5:51 pm
Sat June 13, 2015

'Seven Good Years' Between The Birth Of A Son, Death Of A Father

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Sat June 13, 2015 6:21 pm

Israeli writer Etgar Keret is beloved around the world for his funny, haunting and frequently fantastical short stories. But he's hardly one to stick to a single medium: on top of his stories, he's written graphic novels, TV shows, movie scripts and a children's book. And public radio fans may know his work from its numerous appearances on This American Life.

But for 25 years — whether in print, on air, on screen or in comic-book form — he only wrote fiction.

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