All Things Considered

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Europe
6:38 pm
Mon August 31, 2015

Foreign Buyers Scoop Up Abandoned Spanish Villages

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Salt
6:03 pm
Mon August 31, 2015

5-Hour Line Turns Barbecue Pilgrims Into Cash Cow For Locals

Line-sitters waited for hours outside Franklin Barbecue in Austin, Texas, on July 3.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon KUT

Originally published on Mon August 31, 2015 7:38 pm

Texas has a barbecue joint known as much for the line of people waiting outside as for its tender brisket.

At Franklin Barbecue in Austin, people start lining up around 5 a.m., waiting six hours, chatting with others in line until the restaurant opens at 11 a.m.

This barbecue place is such a big deal that entrepreneurs like Desmond Roldan are cashing in on its fans.

"People know me. I'm a big deal," he says, chuckling.

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Politics
6:03 pm
Mon August 31, 2015

Anti-Establishment Candidates Trump, Sanders Continue Rise In The Polls

Originally published on Mon August 31, 2015 7:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Technology
4:37 pm
Mon August 31, 2015

North Dakota Law Aims To Set Parameters For Police Use Of Drones

Originally published on Mon August 31, 2015 7:45 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Science
4:37 pm
Mon August 31, 2015

Katrina Sparked Push To Improve Hurricane Forecasting

Originally published on Mon August 31, 2015 7:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Latin America
4:37 pm
Mon August 31, 2015

Tensions Rise At Border As Dominican Republic Begins Deporting Haitians

Originally published on Mon August 31, 2015 6:38 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Animals
6:36 pm
Sun August 30, 2015

WATCH: Octopuses Appear To Take Up Arms As Submarine Warfare Escalates

Two octopuses going at it — or, as marine biologist Peter Godfrey-Smith might put it, engaging in a bit of "ornery" behavior.
Peter Godfrey-Smith (CUNY and University of Sydney), David Scheel (Alaska Pacific University), Stefan Linquist (University of Guelph) and Matthew Lawrence.

Originally published on Mon August 31, 2015 8:48 am

There may be an octopus arms race underway. And that's not even a joke about tentacles: Octopuses are actually fighting, and potentially using weapons.

The creatures are hardly team players under the best of circumstances.

"Octopuses in general are regarded as fairly solitary animals," says Peter Godfrey-Smith, a marine biologist at the City University of New York. He is studying octopuses in Australia's Jervis Bay — specifically, the common Sydney octopus, also known as the gloomy octopus.

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Author Interviews
6:17 pm
Sun August 30, 2015

The Glimmering Sheen Of A Wide World Seen From Inside A Bubble

Ariel Zambelich NPR

Originally published on Sun August 30, 2015 6:41 pm

Teenagers often feel bound by their parents' rules, and many young people feel isolated at some point, separated from the rest of the world.

But what would life be like for a young woman who was literally isolated — and bound by rules designed to save her life?

It's a question that author Nicola Yoon explores in her new novel for young adults, Everything, Everything. For 18 years, her lead character, Madeleine, has been kept inside a sterile house, interacting only with her mother and her nurse.

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Animals
5:34 pm
Sun August 30, 2015

Small Shocks Help Enormous Birds Learn To Avoid Power Lines

California condors have enormous wingspans. That's fine in the wilderness, but when a bird of this size encounters a power line, the results can be fatal. The San Diego Zoo Safari Park has a program to help train birds to avoid the hazard.
Jon Myatt U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr

The California condor is big. In fact, it's the largest flying bird in North America with a wingspan of 9 1/2 feet.

Michael Mace, curator of birds for the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, tells NPR's Arun Rath that the condor "is like the 747 compared to a Cessna if you look at it proportionally with other species like eagles and turkey vultures."

Mace works in a condor power line aversion training program at the zoo. It was developed to address the condors' unfortunate run-ins with power lines.

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Research News
6:37 pm
Sat August 29, 2015

Shooters Quicker To Pull Trigger When Target Is Black, Study Finds

Shown a realistic human target — not just a silhouette like this one — shooters were more likely to pull the trigger if the target was black, according to an analysis of 42 studies. "Even if you think that you're not prejudiced," says researcher Yara Mekawi, "that doesn't necessarily mean that that's true in terms of split-second decisions that you might make in the real world."
Joshua Lott Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 31, 2015 1:24 pm

Are most people more likely to pull the trigger of a gun if the person they're shooting at is black?

A new meta-analysis set out to answer that question. Yara Mekawi of the University of Illinois and her co-author, Konrad Bresin, drew together findings from 42 different studies on trigger bias to examine whether race affects how likely a target is to be shot.

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Music Interviews
5:11 pm
Sat August 29, 2015

Nathaniel Rateliff, Honky-Tonk Soul Man, Stumbles Into A Hit

Nathaniel Rateliff and the Night Sweats.
Malia James Courtesy of the artist

There's a song out there right now that's catching a lot of people off guard. "S.O.B" sounds kind of familiar, maybe like a revived oldie, but it's not: It's fresh off the new self-titled album from the Denver ensemble Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats.

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U.S.
6:48 pm
Fri August 28, 2015

Worsening Wildfire Seasons Tax The Forest Service

An airplane used to fight wildfires flies over a blaze that flared up near Omak, Wash., on Thursday.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Sun August 30, 2015 11:53 pm

This has been one of the worst — and most expensive — wildfire seasons ever in the Northwest, where climate change and a history of suppressing wildfires have created a dangerous buildup of fuels.

With fires burning hotter and more intense, there are renewed calls to change how the federal government pays to fight the biggest fires.

"These large and intense fires are a natural disaster in much the same way a hurricane or a tornado or a flood is," U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack says. "And they ought to be funded as such through the emergency funding of FEMA."

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Jazz Night In America
5:59 pm
Fri August 28, 2015

All About That Bass, But Give The Drummer Some

Bassist Christian McBride syncs up with drummer Lewis Nash in 2011.
Simon Russell Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 28, 2015 6:31 pm

Here's a duo that's at the foundation of music itself, but which isn't always noticed: the musical interplay between the bass and the drum.

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The Salt
5:08 pm
Fri August 28, 2015

In A Remote Part Of Washington, A Scramble To Save Cattle From Flames

Cattle rancher Craig Vejraska pours out feed while checking on his cattle in a smokey field in Cox Meadow, as the Okanogan Complex fires burn outside Omak, Wash., Aug. 26, 2015.
Ian C. Bates for NPR

Originally published on Mon August 31, 2015 10:15 am

More than 1,000 square miles of wildfires are burning in Washington state. In the remote Okanogan Valley in the north-central part of the state, many cattle ranchers are scrambling to save their herds.

Ranchers in Omak, Wash., have lost animals, barns, pasture and winter haystacks to the wildfires. But some people still have their cattle, and at the town's Ag Tech Feed Store, owners Monte and Laurie Andrews are trying to help keep those ranchers in business.

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Music Interviews
5:07 pm
Thu August 27, 2015

'It's Fun To Get A Little Deeper': Carly Rae Jepsen Walks The Pop-Star Tightrope

Three years ago, Carly Rae Jepsen dominated the summer with a hit no one saw coming. Her new album is called Emotion.
Matthew Welch Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri August 28, 2015 6:31 pm

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Parallels
5:28 pm
Wed August 26, 2015

Kansas, South Carolina Take NIMBY Stance On Guantanamo Prisoners

The Pentagon's only maximum security prison, at the U.S. Army's Fort Leavenworth in Kansas, is one of the facilities being considered for placement of Guantanamo prisoners deemed too dangerous to release.
Julie Denesha Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 27, 2015 3:41 pm

In hopes that it can persuade Congress to drop its prohibition on transferring detainees in Guantanamo to American soil, the White House is hunting for a highly secure place in the U.S. for some 50 detainees. Labeled as "enemy combatants," they've been held for more than a decade without trial in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, at a camp President Obama has promised to close.

Unlike the 52 other captives at Guantanamo whose release can occur as soon as a country is found to take them, these detainees are considered too dangerous to release at all. They're known as "unreleasables."

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Around the Nation
6:50 pm
Tue August 25, 2015

Online Magazine Searches For The Worst Store Name Puns

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

There is a subset of puns - businesses that name themselves based on a pun. You know, the kind of thing you see on a storefront sign that makes you groan or maybe laugh, depending on your mood.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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It's All Politics
6:37 pm
Tue August 25, 2015

Ted Cruz Rallies Evangelicals In Campaign To Defund Planned Parenthood

Sen. Ted Cruz prays before the start of his Religious Liberty Rally last weekend in Des Moines, Iowa. The event was part of Cruz's push to energize evangelical voters.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 27, 2015 6:51 pm

Evangelical voters are courted every presidential election by Republicans, especially in Iowa. But this year, they could have an even larger impact.

That's because a slew of Southern states are holding primaries on the same day in March of next year, just a month after Iowa votes. And one candidate is making a bold early effort to win them over — Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.

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Code Switch
6:37 pm
Tue August 25, 2015

Award-Winning Casting Director Says Diversity Isn't A Trend, It's Evolution

Originally published on Tue August 25, 2015 7:19 pm

In today's crowded TV landscape, the casting director's job is no small thing. And that talent will be honored at the Emmy Awards next month. Jennifer Euston, who has been in the casting business for two decades, has been nominated this year for outstanding casting for a comedy series and for a drama series.

"I get the script, I read it, I break it down. Anyone who has a speaking part is my responsibility," she says. "Even if the person says, 'Hi' — one word."

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Author Interviews
6:25 pm
Sun August 23, 2015

Do America's Military Bases Abroad Help Or Hinder Global Security?

U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptors are seen parked at Kadena Air Base on the island of Okinawa in Japan. The U.S. military established a presence on Okinawa during World War II.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 25, 2015 9:47 am

The U.S. has around 800 military bases outside of the nation's borders. They're home to hundreds of thousands of troops and family members, and, in many cases, they're a cause of controversy.

David Vine, an associate professor of anthropology at American University, argues that we've become too dependent on such overseas bases — and that many of them cause serious opposition abroad. He lays out his thinking in his new book, Base Nation: How the U.S. Military Bases Abroad Harm America and the World.

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Television
5:53 pm
Sun August 23, 2015

In 'Walking Dead' Spin-Off, Expect To Get An Apocalyptic Education

Fear The Walking Dead follows high school English teacher Travis Manawa (Cliff Curtis) and guidance counselor Madison Clark (Kim Dickens) as they deal with the fallout of a mysterious outbreak.
Justin Lubin AMC

When Fear the Walking Dead premiers Sunday night on AMC, don't expect to see Sheriff Grimes. There's no Daryl, either. In fact, the streets aren't even overrun yet with those dirty, hungry hoards of the undead that viewers know so well.

Still, something weird is happening — and it's happening in LA, not Atlanta, this time around. Fear, a prequel to the hit show The Walking Dead, swaps the post-apocalyptic Deep South for the West Coast, where that apocalypse still has yet to happen (or is just getting underway).

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NPR Story
7:38 pm
Sat August 22, 2015

Bugs Leave As Quickly As They Swarmed In Days Before Burning Man

A bicycle rider makes it through a dense sandstorm during the Burning Man Festival in 2000. Hail, wind and dust storms are regular occurrences at the festival — and for a while, there were fears that this year's celebration would also include an infestation of bugs.
Hector Mata AFP/Getty Images

Thousands of people are set to descend on the Black Rock Desert of Nevada for the annual Burning Man Festival, starting August 30. But before their arrival, the campgrounds were visited by another group of guests: bugs.

John Curley is a photographer and blogger for the Burning Man website. He says he first noticed the bugs at a gas station near Black Rock.

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NPR Story
6:51 pm
Sat August 22, 2015

New Orleans Neighborhoods Scrabble For Hope In Abandoned Ruins

Angela Chalk looks at a home in New Orleans' 7th Ward that hasn't been touched since Hurricane Katrina. Chalk, the vice president of the 7th Ward neighborhood association, spends some of her free time tracking down and reporting dilapidated and abandoned properties.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon August 24, 2015 10:27 am

Angela Chalk lives right in the middle of New Orleans, in the 7th Ward. Her house withstood Hurricane Katrina's pounding winds, but not the flood that followed when the federal levee system failed.

"I had 6 feet of water," she says, pointing to a watermark on her wall.

And she wasn't alone. About 80 percent of the city's homes were inundated with floodwater. It was weeks before the water receded and Chalk was able to return home.

When she did, what she found was a crusty brown mess.

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Around the Nation
5:27 pm
Sat August 22, 2015

U.S. Compensates Marine Exposed To Toxic Chemicals In '80s

Lt. Col. Kris Roberts served as a facilities maintenance officer at Marine Corps Air Station Futenma in Okinawa, Japan in the 1980s.
Courtesy of Lt. Col. Kris Roberts

Originally published on Sat August 22, 2015 7:03 pm

The horror of Agent Orange and its effects on Vietnam war veterans and Vietnamese citizens is well-documented.

But many U.S. veterans who never fought in that war say they, too, handled toxic chemicals at military bases around the world, suffering the same health consequences. Retired Lt. Col. Kris Roberts is among them.

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Law
5:03 pm
Sat August 22, 2015

Off The Streets And Onto The Syllabus: The Freddie Gray Course

A mural dedicated to Freddie Gray remains in the Sandtown neighborhood of Baltimore where he was arrested in May of this year. Gray's later death in custody sparked days of unrest in the city — and, now, has inspired a course at the University of Maryland law school.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 22, 2015 7:03 pm

It's been less than six months since Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old African-American man, died after sustaining severe injuries in police custody. At the time, Gray's death set off days of demonstrations in Baltimore — as well as rioting and criminal charges against six police officers. Those officers have all pleaded not guilty.

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The Salt
5:19 pm
Fri August 21, 2015

Eating Healthy At The Iowa State Fair Means Salad On A Stick

Caprese salad on a stick is one of the healthier options at this year's Iowa State Fair.
Sarah McCammon/NPR

Originally published on Fri August 21, 2015 6:23 pm

Trying to find healthy food at a state fair awash with deep-fried Oreos and foot-long corn dogs is no easy task.

At the Iowa State Fair, one of the rites of passage is trying food on a stick.

But dietitian Nikki Stahr, who works for the Iowa-based Hy-Vee grocery chain, is running a booth at the fair promoting healthy eating and portion control.

She has her work cut out for her.

There's an old fashioned hand-dipped ice cream stand and a cookie booth right across from her, so she's got some competition for her message of healthy eating.

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Book News & Features
5:19 pm
Fri August 21, 2015

Mom And Toddler Put Sleep-Inducing 'Rabbit' Book To The Test

Courtesy of Carl- Johan Forssen Ehrlin

Originally published on Wed August 26, 2015 6:44 pm

Every so often, a genuine publishing phenomenon emerges. The latest one is no Harry Potter, but the reason for its meteoric rise to the top of Amazon's best-seller list is self-evident. On the cover of Carl- Johan Forssen Ehrlin's self-published The Rabbit Who Wants to Fall Asleep there's a sign that reads, "I can make anyone fall asleep" — and that's a promise sleep-deprived parents can't resist.

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Parallels
5:19 pm
Fri August 21, 2015

Ultra-Orthodox In Israel: Keeping Cool While Keeping Customs

In the ultra-Orthodox Jewish neighborhood of Mea Sharim, men wear dark pants, long dark coats and black hats.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Fri August 21, 2015 5:58 pm

In the hot sun of a Jerusalem afternoon, kids wait for a fountain to turn on.

When water spouts into the air, 9-year-old Tzipora Baranas jumps right in. She's wearing black tights, a black, below-the-knee skirt and a long-sleeved black shirt.

"It's fun when the water spritzes up in my face," she says.

She is Orthodox Jewish and her outfit is in deference to religious modesty. She says she's not hot at all, despite the temperature hitting the 90s and the dark clothes covering all but her face and hands.

Of course, she is dripping wet at the moment.

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Parallels
4:27 pm
Fri August 21, 2015

For Kazakhstan's LGBT Community, A Struggle For Recognition And Rights

LGBT activists in Kazakhstan hoped international attention from hosting the Winter Olympics might help their cause.
Shamil Zhumatov Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri August 21, 2015 10:05 pm

Last month, the Central Asian nation of Kazakhstan made the news, as it competed with Beijing to host the 2022 Winter Olympic Games.

Kazakhstan lost its bid, but the effort drew attention to the problems faced by the country's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.

Human rights campaigners were hoping that if Kazakhstan were chosen, the country would face international pressure to improve conditions for people with different sexual and gender orientations.

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NPR Story
4:19 pm
Fri August 21, 2015

Mayor Landrieu To Displaced New Orleanians: 'Y'all Can Come Home'

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu speaks about New Orleans' emergence as a model of urban renewal and economic recovery 10 years after Hurricane Katrina during a visit Tuesday to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 21, 2015 5:19 pm

After the levees broke 10 years ago in New Orleans, tens of thousands of residents fled the city and never returned. They resettled in 32 states around the nation, many of them landing in Houston.

New Home Family Worship Center also relocated to that city and became the spiritual family for a dislocated and homesick congregation. Most of the people who came to a special worship service Thursday night were born in New Orleans. With "Katrina 10" projected on the screen behind the altar, Pastor Robert C. Blakes introduced his special guest.

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