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Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition: bringing you the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. A two-hour mix of news, analysis, interviews, commentaries, arts, features and music, Morning Edition is heard Monday through Friday, with local news and coverage anchored by Steve Goss.

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All Tech Considered
6:08 am
Mon July 27, 2015

Major Flaw In Android Phones Would Let Hackers In With Just A Text

A security gap on Android, the most popular smartphone operating system, was discovered by security experts in a lab and is so far not widely exploited.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 1:48 pm

Android is the most popular mobile operating system on Earth: About 80 percent of smartphones run on it. And, according to mobile security experts at the firm Zimperium, there's a gaping hole in the software — one that would let hackers break into someone's phone and take over, just by knowing the phone's number.

Just A Text

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Parallels
6:14 am
Fri July 24, 2015

Obama's Roots A Source Of Pride — And Discord — In Kenya

Workers finish installing a billboard showing Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta and President Barack Obama in downtown Nairobi a day before Obama's visit.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 6:05 pm

The billboard that President Obama will see when he exits the airport in Nairobi on Friday says: "Welcome Home, Mr. President."

Obama's Kenyan roots have been a source of pride, but at times a source of discord, too, in the land of his father's birth.

For example, when Barack Obama won the U.S. presidency in 2008, Kenyans were ecstatic. His victory was declared a national holiday.

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Strange News
5:28 am
Fri July 24, 2015

Trapped Under A Car, A Women Is Saved By A Crowd

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 9:24 am

A motorcyclist in Dallas crashed into a car and the rider ended up trapped under the car.

Emergency personnel tried to use a jack to lift the vehicle, but it failed. And it was taking too long to bring heavier equipment.

So a crowd of emergency responders and passers-by lifted the vehicle by hand.

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NPR Story
9:40 am
Thu July 23, 2015

Things Not To Pack When Flying: Smoke Grenades, Bottle Rockets, Knives

When packing for a trip, you have that moment of wondering if security will let you carry on that item.

We're not sure what that moment was like for Mitchell Crawford.

Airport security in Baltimore went through Mr. Crawford's luggage.

They found smoke grenades and bottle rockets. And rope cutters. And several knives. Also a folding saw. And a hatchet.

Mr. Crawford is now under arrest, though he told police he simply meant to use the items while camping.

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Middle East
9:40 am
Thu July 23, 2015

U.S. Defense Secretary Makes Unannounced Visit To Iraq

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 11:32 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Strange News
9:40 am
Thu July 23, 2015

Struck By Lighting As A Kid, A Lottery Winner As An Adult

Lady Luck has a sense of humor. The odds of being struck by lightning or winning the lottery are very slim.

The likelihood that both will happen to the same person are about one in 2.6 trillion. Peter McCathie is that one.

The Canadian man survived a lightning strike when he was a kid.

And now, after buying lottery tickets for about a year, McCathie has struck it big. He won a million dollars.

He's not gambling with the winnings. He's taking his wife on a second honeymoon.

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NPR Story
6:12 am
Wed July 22, 2015

Pets And Other Non-Humans Gets Rights Upgraded In A Spanish Town

Originally published on Wed July 22, 2015 7:52 am

The Declaration of Independence says "all men are created equal."

It took a civil war to show it really meant all men, and generations more to make it all men and women.

Now a small town in Spain has taken another step.

The town council of Trigueros de Valle declared all residents are born equal.

That includes pets.

"A resident, whether human or non-human, is entitled to respect," the council decreed.

Bullfighting is out. It's not clear if dogs and cats get to vote.

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Strange News
6:02 am
Tue July 21, 2015

In Transylvania, Donating Blood Will Get You Concert Tickets

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 7:20 am

An electro-dance festival in Romania "vants to suck your blood."

Concert-goers will get free or discounted tickets for donating blood for transfusions.

Organizers aim to raise awareness about donating in a country where less than 2 percent of people give blood.

The Festival is being held in Transylvania, home of Dracula. Let's hope the Count doesn't make an appearance looking for music from the children of the night.

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Sports
7:20 am
Mon July 20, 2015

For The Rubik's Cube World Champ, 6 Seconds Is Plenty Of Time

The Rubik's Cube world championships were held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, over the weekend, drawing participants from more than 40 countries. The winner completed his cube in 5.69 seconds.
Lourdes Garcia-Navarro NPR

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 4:14 pm

Brazil hosted the World Cup last year. Next year, it will host the Summer Olympics. On Sunday, though, the country played host to another international gathering of talented competitors: the Rubik's Cube World Championship.

This past weekend, hundreds of "speedcubers," as they're known, descended on Sao Paulo from over 40 countries, to take part in three days of intensive competition.

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Shots - Health News
6:54 am
Mon July 20, 2015

Sometimes A Little More Minecraft May Be Quite All Right

At a Minecraft camp in Shaker Heights, Ohio, kids trade secrets about making their virtual worlds come to life.
Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 4:49 pm

It's family vacation time, and I've taken the kids back to where I grew up — a small plot of land off a dirt road in Kansas.

For my city kids, this is supposed to be heaven. There are freshly laid chicken eggs to gather, new kittens to play with and miles of pasture to explore.

But we're not outside.

I'm sitting in my childhood bedroom watching my 7-year-old son and his 11-year-old-cousin stare at a screen. The older kid is teaching the younger the secrets of one of the most popular games on Earth: Minecraft.

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Business
6:45 am
Mon July 20, 2015

Commerce Department: Tighter Controls Needed For Cyberweapons

The Commerce Department is looking to place tighter controls on exporting software that can attack a network. The cybersecurity industry opposes the proposed new rules.
Patrick George Ikon Images/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 9:18 pm

Federal regulators are looking to place tighter controls on the export of cyberweapons following the megabreaches against the Office of Personnel Management and countless retailers.

The Commerce Department wants to ensure that software that can attack a network — the kind that can break in, bypass encryption and steal data — can't be shipped overseas without permission. But the cybersecurity industry is up in arms.

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Animals
7:52 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Plantigrade Pastry Purloiner Persnickety

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 7:55 am

A Colorado bear recently had itself a heck of a breakfast: 24 pies.

The owners of the Colorado Cherry Company bakery between Lyons and Estes Park say they've experienced bear break-ins before, but this one was a little choosy.

Apparently during his early morning ransack, the bear went for apple and cherry pies — but left the strawberry rhubarb pies untouched.

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Strange News
7:52 am
Fri July 17, 2015

A Siberian Town Throws A Party For Pests — And Masochists

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 7:55 am

When you have visitors you can't get rid, sometimes you just have to embrace them. That's the idea behind a festival on this week in the remote Siberian town of Berezniki, which is celebrating mosquitoes.

Revelers dress in mosquito costumes, vie to catch the most mosquitoes — and, perhaps oddest of all, hold a "most delicious girl" competition.

A panel of judges inspect contestants for who can get the most bites. The winner two years back had over 100.

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Shots - Health News
5:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

'When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors' To Best Avoid Lightning's Pain

You don't have to be outdoors to be hurt or injured by a nearby lightning strike, like this one in New Mexico. The pain for survivors can be lifelong.
Marko Korosec Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 10:19 am

Lightning strikes have killed at least 20 people in the U.S. so far this year, according to the National Weather Service. That's higher than the average for recent years, the service says.

Most people who are injured or killed by lightning, it turns out, are not struck directly — instead, the bolt lands nearby.

That's what happened to Steve Marshburn in 1969. He was working inside a bank and says lightning somehow made its way through an ungrounded speaker at the drive-through window to the stool where he was sitting.

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Science
5:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Science Confirms 2014 Was Hottest Yet Recorded, On Land And Sea

Floodwaters from rising sea levels have submerged and killed trees in Bedono village in Demak, Central Java, Indonesia. As oceans warm, they expand and erode the shore. Residents of Java's coastal villages have been hit hard by rising sea levels in recent years.
Ulet Ifansasti Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 10:14 am

For the past quarter-century, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has been gathering data from more than 400 scientists around the world on climate trends.

The report on 2014 from these international researchers? On average, it was the hottest year ever — in the ocean, as well as on land.

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The Salt
11:03 am
Thu July 16, 2015

The Fall Of A Dairy Darling: How Cottage Cheese Got Eclipsed By Yogurt

Cottage cheese peaked in the early 1970s, when the average American ate about 5 pounds of it per year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 1:52 pm

As you know, here at The Salt we've been a little obsessed with yogurt lately.

But there's a flip side to the story of the yogurt boom. What about that other product made from fermented milk that had its boom from 1950 to 1975, and has been sliding into obscurity ever since?

Cottage cheese took off as a diet and health food in the 1950s.

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Parallels
8:41 am
Thu July 16, 2015

The View From Inside Syria

Saeed al-Batal, a Syrian photographer, posted this image from Douma, Syria, on his Facebook page on March 31.
Courtesy of Saeed al-Batal

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 3:46 pm

Syria's civil war has created the worst refugee crisis in the world, with more than 4 million people fleeing the country. Millions more have been displaced inside Syria, though we rarely hear from them.

Over the past year, NPR's Morning Edition has spoken three times with Saeed al-Batal, a photographer and filmmaker who doesn't use his real name for security reasons.

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The Two-Way
5:02 am
Thu July 16, 2015

'Buckyballs' Solve Century-Old Mystery About Interstellar Space

Harry Kroto, pictured in 1996, displays a model of the geodesic-shaped carbon molecules that he helped discover.
Michael Scates AP

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 11:03 am

Researchers in Switzerland say they've solved a nearly 100-year-old astronomical mystery by discovering what's in the wispy cloud of gas that floats in the space between the stars.

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Strange News
5:43 am
Wed July 15, 2015

Clearer Than Bureacratese: Airport Official Replies To Politician In Klingon

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 8:25 am

Maj po.

That was "good morning" in Klingon, the fictional language from "Star Trek."

You'd have to be able to speak the language in order to understand a recent statement from a government spokesperson in Wales.

When Darren Miller, an opposition politician, asked about possible UFO sightings at an airport, the spokesperson responded — in Klingon — that her boss would reply in due course.

Millar told the BBC this confirmed his suspicion — that members of government were from another planet.

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Around the Nation
5:43 am
Wed July 15, 2015

A Month Into Summer, Boston's Finally Out Of Snow

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 8:25 am

It's mid-July, and winter has finally ended in Boston — at least symbolically. On Tuesday, Boston's mayor announced that the giant pile of dirty snow left over from the city's record-breaking snowfall had finally melted.

The seven-story snow tower took so long to thaw out that there was a citywide contest to guess when it would go away. In response to the news, Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker tweeted: "Our nightmare is finally over!"

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Digital Life
5:24 am
Tue July 14, 2015

Legal Name Change? Facebook Still Won't Let You Be Maj. Major Major Major

Originally published on Tue July 14, 2015 11:25 am

Facebook has been cracking down on fake names, and recently went after Jemma Rogers, who set up an account as "Jemmaroid Von Laalaa" in 2008.

Facebook demanded she prove it's her name, so she tried to Photoshop "Jemmaroid" onto her bank cards.

Facebook didn't buy it, so she legally changed her name to "Jemmaroid Von Laalaa."

Facebook still wouldn't budge, but say they're "looking into the matter."

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Goats and Soda
12:57 pm
Mon July 13, 2015

How One Woman Found The Courage To Say No To Domestic Abuse

Saroj's teenage son watches her comb her hair before she heads to work.
Rhitu Chatterjee for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 14, 2015 3:35 pm

Saroj is a cook at a public school in her village, Dujana, in the northern Indian state of Haryana. Like most people in this state, she doesn't have a last name.

She walks to work down narrow streets of concrete homes with cows and buffaloes outside. She is short, only about 5 feet 2, but she walks tall and confident in her traditional mustard-colored tunic and pants. Her tanned face is framed by big, dark eyes and a square jaw.

As Saroj passes an old man sitting outside a house, she leans in close to me and starts whispering.

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Television
5:24 am
Mon July 13, 2015

Even Retired Comedians Can't Resist A Few Good Trump Jokes

Originally published on Mon July 13, 2015 12:48 pm

David Letterman returned to comedy at a Friday show in San Antonio, saying that retiring from Late Night before Donald Trump announced his presidential run was "the biggest mistake of my life."

He offered a brand-new Top Ten list, aimed directly at the Donald. Shots taken included:

10 - His toupee is actually the gopher in "Caddyshack."

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World
5:04 am
Mon July 13, 2015

A Do-Not-Fly List For The Do-Not-Tan Crowd

Originally published on Mon July 13, 2015 12:48 pm

Paul and Sheena Wain were on their way to the Maldives for vacation — but when they tried to check in for their flight in Manchester, England, the airline turned them down, saying their 14-year-old daughter Grace appeared pale, maybe sick.

In fact, Grace is red-haired and fair-skinned.

"We live in Scotland," her dad said. "That's just the way she is."

Grace was finally allowed to board after the family got a note from her doctor.

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Atlanta History
9:06 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Atlanta's Oakland Cemetery Gets A New Greenhouse

In its 1800s heyday, families used the greenhouse to store tropical plants through the winter, including species like this banana plant.
Historic Oakland Cemetery

Once, there was a greenhouse at Oakland Cemetery. But for decades, all that remained of the old Victorian structure was rubble. However, that’s changing as the cemetery erects a new greenhouse in the exact same spot.

The story of how the cemetery got its new greenhouse is a tale of historical musical chairs. It starts at Zoo Atlanta, in Grant Park. As the zoo expands, Grant Park’s Cyclorama is moving to the Atlanta History Center. However, the plot of land at the History Center where the giant Civil War mural is slated to go is presently occupied by a greenhouse.

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NPR Story
5:06 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Why It's An Uphill Battle To Make Indianapolis A More Pedestrian Friendly City

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 7:33 am

Copyright 2015 WFYI-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wfyi.org.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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NPR Story
5:06 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Implementation Of Obamacare Remains A Work In Progress

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 1:15 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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NPR Story
5:06 am
Fri July 3, 2015

The Legal Business Of Marijuana Is Growing But The Industry Lacks Diversity

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 7:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
5:06 am
Fri July 3, 2015

When Greeks Vote Sunday, It's Not Just About A Debt Deal

A man waits at an Athens bus stop where the Greek word "no" has been spray-painted over "yes" on a banner put up in advance of Sunday's referendum. Greek voters will say whether they want to accept or reject a deal that's been offered by the country's creditors. Greeks are deeply divided and analysts say the outcome is not clear.
Thanassis Stavrakis AP

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 12:20 pm

Elisavet Zachariadou is a retired professor of history in Athens. She admires Italian art and reads French literature and German philosophy. She considers herself a European.

"When I learned that Greece is going to be part of the European Union [in the 1980s], I was very happy," she recalls. "And I said, 'How nice. And how good for all of us.' "

But Zachariadou's attachment to Europe is complex. She's 84 and lives in the Athens suburb where she grew up during World War II, when Nazi Germany invaded Greece and her people suffered horribly.

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U.S.
6:08 am
Wed July 1, 2015

After Supreme Court Decision, What's Next For Gay Rights Groups?

Carlos McKnight waves a flag in support of same-sex marriage outside the Supreme Court.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 3:42 pm

Having clinched the long-sought prize of same-sex marriage in all 50 states, some long-time advocates are now waking up to the realization that they need to find a new job. At least one major same-sex marriage advocacy group is preparing to close down and other LGBT organizations are retooling.

They have grown from a ragtag group with a radical idea into a massive multi-million dollar industry of slick and sophisticated sellers of a dream. Today, their very success has made their old jobs obsolete.

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