Arts

City Lights
10:00 am
Tue March 3, 2015

Atlanta-Based Filmmakers Inspire With Documentary On The African Children's Choir

Angel, one of the main characters in the documentary ''Imba Means Sing,'' leads her fellow African Children's Choir friends through the schoolyard.
Credit Ashley Nicole Jones

In the 1980s, television stations, magazines and newspapers were covered with  images of African children with distended bellies and flies covering their faces. This was the time of Live Aid and Michael Jackson's "We Are the World," – large-scale recordings and concerts to send money to the poor and starving in Africa.

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City Lights
1:00 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

A Never-Ending Legacy: Gordon Parks' Photography Permeates Atlanta

'Untitled, Miami, Florida, 1966.' Arnika Dawkins Gallery has Gordon Parks' 'American Champion' on display until the end of March.
Credit Gordon Parks / Courtesy of and copyright The Gordon Parks Foundation.

He died in 2006, but Renaissance man Gordon Parks is still making his mark on Atlanta.

In collaboration with each other and in conjunction with the Gordon Parks Foundation, two Atlanta galleries and the High Museum of Art have been featuring Parks' photographs for the past few months.

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City Lights
11:43 am
Mon March 2, 2015

'Tin Man' Artist Charlie Lucas Showcases His Folk Art at MINT

Charlie Lucas, during his artist talk at MINT Gallery in Atlanta, Feb. 21, 2015.
Credit Jason Parker / WABE

MINT Gallery has an exhibition of works by folk artist Charlie Lucas on view until March 22.

Lucas is a self-taught artist known for his figurative paintings and sculptures made from found objects and salvaged materials.

He's made large, metallic human figures, 14-foot-tall dinosaurs and even some abstract work, all from what some people would consider trash.

I recently spoke with Lucas and began by asking him why he goes by the pseudonym “Tin Man.”

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Arts
10:06 am
Mon March 2, 2015

Putting Folk Art In Context With Incoming High Museum Curator

Katherine Jentleson has been appointed as the High Museum's Merrie and Dan Boone curator of folk and self-taught art.
Credit Travis Dove / Courtesy of the High Museum

The High Museum of Art has been lauded for their many special exhibitions, but their ever-growing permanent collection holds many priceless and important works of art, not least of all in their collection of folk art.

The High began collecting folk art in the 1970s, and in fact they’re the first general museum in North America to have — starting in 1994 — a full-time curator devoted to folk and self-taught art.

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City Lights
11:00 am
Fri February 27, 2015

For Breast Cancer Research, Survivors And Others Turn Their Bodies Into Art

The women of Greater Atlanta Hadassah who helped make this Saturday's art event, ''The Big Reveal,'' happen. Pictured here from left: Holly Strelzik, Joan Solomon, Barbara Lang, Susan Proctor and Sue Rothstein.
Credit Stephannie Stokes / WABE

 

Walk through a modern art museum, and you’re sure to find naked women on the canvases that line the walls. Artists have been drawing, painting and photographing the nude female body for centuries. For just as long, artists have been presenting ideals of what the female body should look like.

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City Lights
1:00 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Fifty Years After The Fact, An Unknown Opera, 'The Passenger,' Gets Discovered

The set of Weinberg's ''The Passenger'' features Auschwitz during the Holocaust on bottom and a grand passenger ship headed to Brazil in the 1960s on top.
Credit Robert Kusel

He is utterly unknown, but the 20th century Russian musical heavyweight Dmitri Shostakovich described his work in this way: "Music of beauty and enormity … it is a perfect masterpiece … it is a hymn to humanity … to the international solidarity of those who, subjected to the most terrible evil, stood up against fascism."

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City Lights
11:07 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Harp Concert Promises To Be Mega

This year the Mega Harp Concert will feature 56 harps. The harpists will play several pieces all together along with a selection of smaller ensemble works.
Credit Courtesy of Mary Ann Flinn

A photo can be a dangerous thing. 

In 2008, the officers of the Georgia Chapter of the American Harp Society saw a picture of a large-scale harp concert. And they thought, "Well, why can't we do something with multiple harps? Because the harp is a lonely instrument," as Mary Ann Flinn, the vice president of the organization, recalled.

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City Lights
10:00 am
Wed February 25, 2015

An Ever-Evolving Musical Genre, Cumbia Has Been Embraced By Latin America

Cumbia is a musical genre that has grown widely popular across the Latin American world. This photo is from a performance in Mar del Plata, Argentina.
Credit Ministerio de Cultura de la Nación Argentina / https://www.flickr.com/photos/secretaria_cultura/

You’ll hear it on the streets of Buenos Aires, in the towns of northern Mexico and also in the Hispanic immigrant communities here in Atlanta. It’s called Cumbia, and it’s one of the most popular musical genres in the Latin American world. 

But while Cumbia is part of mainstream music culture in many Latin American countries today, it started out as the music of only the lower class in Colombia's Caribbean coastal region.

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City Lights
12:00 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Franco-American Fusion: Top-Charting Pianist Releases Album

Simone Dinnerstein releases her new album Tuesday that features French and American composers.
Credit Lisa-Marie Mazzuco

In 2015, it seems normal for burgeoning artists to self-fund their projects online and through fundraisers. In 2007, however, online platforms like Kickstarter didn’t even exist.

So, when pianist Simone Dinnerstein raised her own funds for her first solo album, which features Bach’s "Goldberg Variations," it was a truly revolutionary move. That album ranked No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Classical Chart in its first week.

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City Lights
5:00 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Hollywood's Wild Ride Of 'Gone With The Wind' Through Fiction

''A Touch of Stardust'' takes a look at the very difficult process of ''Gone with the Wind'' through a young screenwriter, new to Hollywood.
Credit Courtesy of Todd Doughty

Who is Kate Alcott? Well, the answer to that question is more literal than existential.

Patricia O’Brien is a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, but she changed her name to Kate Alcott for her books after a publishing house rejected one of her novels when she was Patricia. But, as Kate Alcott — Alcott, of course, from the author of "Little Women"  it was accepted in a flash.

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Theater
10:15 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Brenda Bynum On The 'Strange Fruit' Of Author Lillian Smith

Lillian Smith's name has slipped from the pantheon of Southern writers, but now her story has been adapted into a one-woman show by Atlanta actor Brenda Bynum.
Credit C. M. Stieglitz / Library of Congress

You may not have heard of Georgian author Lillian Smith.  She was one of the first prominent white Southerners to speak out publicly against racial segregation in the 1930s and 40s.

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City Lights
10:00 am
Fri February 20, 2015

Blood, Guts And Film Festivals

In ''The Demon's Rook,'' human Roscoe trains with demon Dimwos.
Credit Courtesy of Mike Morgan

Since graduating from Georgia State's film program in 2009, Mike Morgan has fallen into a world of horror. Independent horror film, that is.  

Morgan worked on the crew for James Sizemore’s "The Demon’s Rook." On crew, he was obliged to play some extra parts as well, which meant he had the privilege to die twice in this Southern, gothic tale of demons, blood and guts.

Currently, Morgan is the assistant director for Tim Reis’ upcoming horror film "Bad Blood." This time around, instead of demons, the great beast of the film is a werefrog.

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Literature
7:54 am
Fri February 20, 2015

Geocaching Meets Exquisite Corpse: Story Drop Takes Writing To The Streets

A Story Drop notebook waiting to be found...somewhere in Atlanta.
Credit Emily Schreck / Story Drop

Thanks in part to the ubiquity of social media, the age-old game of the scavenger hunt has returned to Atlanta’s streets.

For instance, there is “Free Art Friday,” where local artists offer small versions of their work for free. The work is often dropped along city streets or parks, posted on Twitter or Instagram, and then the hunt is on.

A new participant to this playful art project puts a literary twist on the game by dropping notebooks in hidden spots around the city.

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City Lights
10:00 am
Thu February 19, 2015

When Jewish Folklore And Holocaust Realities Collide

Jake Krakovsky plays about a dozen characters in ''Yankl on the Moon.''
Credit Egan Marie

When you enter the Alliance Theatre’s Black Box, you see Yankl, played by Jake Krakovsky, sitting on top of what looks like the skeleton of a very large barrel. He appears to be reading some sort large, aged book.

In Chelm, a town in Poland, Yankl had the important job of making sure no swine entered the village. But now, he and the stories within him are the only things left.

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Poetry
12:14 pm
Wed February 18, 2015

British Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy To Do Reading At Emory

Writer and poet Carol Ann Duffy poses for photographs at John Rylands Library in Manchester, England, on May 1, 2009, after being named as Britain's poet laureate.
Credit Paul Thomas / Associated Press

A British poet laureate is scheduled to give a free reading at Emory this weekend.

The university says award-winning Scottish poet Carol Ann Duffy will give a free reading at Glenn Auditorium on the school's campus Saturday at 4 p.m. No tickets are required, but seating is limited in the auditorium.

Books will be available for purchase, and a signing event will be held immediately after the reading.

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City Lights
3:52 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

From Vaudeville To Elvis, Alan Lightman's Memoir Chronicles Memphis

Alan Lightman will be talking at the Margaret Mitchell House about his new memoir on Memphis, family, and the movies.
Credit Michiko Clark

By trade, Alan Lightman is a physicist, but he has traversed that tricky space between science and the humanities and has written award-winning novels.

His 1992 novel "Einstein’s Dreams" is an international bestseller. Along with having been translated into thirty languages, artists have adapted it into plays, dances, musical compositions, and paintings. It is also an educational tool and can be found in university classrooms across the globe. 

Another one of his novels, "The Diagnosis," was a National Book Award finalist.

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City Lights
12:00 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

Everything You Never Needed To Know About The Double Bass

Large, double basses don't necessarily make a big sound.
Credit Gabbie Watts / WABE

In a symphony orchestra, perched behind the smaller stringed instruments, sit about eight unreasonably large double basses.

But, contrary to how one might think size should work, bigger does not mean louder. And while it might seem that the bass section generally has an easier part in a symphonic piece than the violinists, “easy” is actually a problematic word. 

In the audio story above, you heard a selection of orchestral works, solos, and concertos that epitomize the student years of the double bass experience.

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City Lights
8:10 pm
Mon February 16, 2015

Civil Rights Performance Brings Powerful Actions, Words And Music To Macon

Violinist Robert McDuffie will accompany actor Anna Deavere Smith in ''Letter From Birmingham Jail.''
Credit Patty Crowe

"Actions count, words matter, music heals" is the mantra of an upcoming performance by violinist Robert McDuffie and actor-playwright Anna Deavere Smith.

McDuffie and Smith first collaborated at the Aspen Ideas Festival a few years ago. Smith performed Martin Luther King Jr.'s famous “Letter From Birmingham Jail,” while McDuffie played a selection of pieces from folk songs to classical repertoire, including “How Great Thou Art,” “Ashokan Farewell,” and Handel’s “Largo,” amongst others.

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Arts
3:51 pm
Fri February 13, 2015

UGA Library To Host Free Exhibit Of Classic 1900s Radios

The collection of tube radios, external speakers and other items dating from 1913 to 1933 was restored by Claude L. Pennington Jr. of Macon.
Credit UGA

An exhibit of classic radios is set to open next week at a University of Georgia library.

The school says the exhibit of radios from the early 1900s will open Feb. 20 at the University of Georgia Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries.

The collection of tube radios, external speakers and other items dating from 1913 to 1933 was restored by Claude L. Pennington Jr. of Macon. Pennington was a doctor who specialized in microsurgery of the inner ear and was fascinated by the tube radio.

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Books
10:15 am
Fri February 13, 2015

A Pair In Peculiar Crimes: A Book Review From The 'City Lights' Mystery Guest

In this week's ''Mystery Guest,'' Michele Ross reviewed Christopher Fowler's ''The Bryant and May Mysteries.''
Credit Gregory Wake / flickr.com/gregwake

Each week on "City Lights," we are joined by our mystery guest, Michele Ross, who is the crime fiction columnist for the Cleveland Plain Dealer and former book editor of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Keeping couples in mind in time for Valentine's Day, Ross reviews a book series featuring a pair of detectives. 

Michele Ross reviewed "The Bryant and May Mysteries" by Christopher Fowler

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City Lights
10:00 am
Fri February 13, 2015

Wife-Husband Production Team Talk Organic Farming, PTSD And Documentary

In their second agriculture-focused documentary, Christine Anthony and Owen Masterson show how female vets use farming to treat their post-traumatic stress disorder.
Credit Christine Anthony and Owen Masterson

When they moved from Los Angeles, California to Atlanta in 2005, Christine Anthony and Owen Masterson couldn’t find much local produce. The farmers market culture of California had yet to take off in Georgia, but they soon realized that it wasn’t because of lack of trying.

“We got involved with an organization called Georgia Organics that was working to promote organic farming and farmers in Georgia, and we went to them and offered our services pro bono,” Anthony said.

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City Lights
11:00 am
Wed February 11, 2015

Amazing Women Take Center Stage In Theatrical Outfit's 'Silent Sky'

Elizabeth Diane Wells plays 19th century astronomer Henrietta Leavitt in Theatrical Outfit's production of ''Silent Sky,'' running from Feb. 11-March 1.
Credit courtesy of Theatrical Outfit

Lauren Gunderson is an award-winning Atlanta-born playwright. Her work has been produced nationwide, and here at home by Synchronicity Theater and the Weird Sisters Theater Project. And now, Theatrical Outfit is staging a production of her show "Silent Sky," the true story of 19th century astronomer Henrietta Leavitt.

Gunderson joined us at member station KALW in San Francisco, and WABE's Lois Reitzes spoke to her about the real story behind the play.

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City Lights
12:00 pm
Fri February 6, 2015

In 'SpeakerKiller,' Local Filmmaker Finds Solidarity In His Subject

''SpeakerKiller,'' a documentary short by Greg Harding, takes a look inside the life of local musician and producer Kamal ''SpeakerKiller'' Gillespie.
Credit Courtesy of Greg Harding

In the second installment of "24 FPS," we go inside Atlanta's music scene through the camera lens. 

In film school, filmmaker Greg Harding focused on narrative film (fiction, for those unfamiliar with film terms), but after working on a documentary for a nonprofit, he quickly fell in love with that style.

His latest project is a documentary short that focuses on Atlanta producer and musician Kamal Gillespie, or his stage name, SpeakerKiller.

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City Lights
10:00 am
Fri February 6, 2015

Alvin Ailey Dancers Return To Atlanta With New Production, 'Odetta'

Alvin Ailey dancer Hope Boykin starring as Odetta Holmes in the company's new production, "Odetta," by Matthew Rushing.
Credit Steve Wilson

The famed Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater returns to the Fox Theatre in Atlanta next week. From Feb. 11-15, the company will perform some of its most well-known pieces, including Alvin Ailey’s celebrated "Revelations." It will also bring an entirely new performance to Atlanta audiences called “Odetta.”

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City Lights
1:46 pm
Thu February 5, 2015

Atlanta Filmmaker Reveals City's Untold Stories

''Golden Child,'' a film by Brantly Watts, documents the life and work of sculptor Shawn Knight.
Credit Courtesy of Brantly Watts

For this edition of "24 FPS (Frames Per Second)", we hear from local filmmaker Brantly Watts. She is primarily a documentary filmmaker but is now venturing into the fiction film realm.

One of her biggest projects was a documentary feature, called "AKA Blondie," which focuses on one of the strippers at the iconic Clermont Lounge. She talks about that and other projects in this segment.

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City Lights
11:07 am
Thu February 5, 2015

Caffeine Competition Time: Baristas Face Off At Coffee Fest

Barista Taylor Castle's stacked tulips.
Credit Courtesy of Gabbie Watts

Three times a year in three different cities across the U.S., Coffee Fest brings together new coffee technologies, coffee classes, coffee professionals and coffee enthusiasts to bask in the glory that is coffee.

It’s the largest coffee trade show in the U.S., and this weekend, it comes Atlanta. This is the first time it’s been here in seven years.

Some of its popular attractions are the competitions: best espresso, best coffee house and best … latte art?

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Arts
8:37 am
Thu February 5, 2015

Teenage Thespians Heading To Annual Acting Conference

The Georgia State Thespian Conference is an annual event for high school students interested in entering the world of acting.
Courtesy Georgia Thespians

The next Marlon Brando or Julia Roberts might be discovered in the Peach State this week.

The Georgia State Thespian Conference — nicknamed “Thescon”— starts Thursday. It's an annual event for high school students interested in entering the world of acting.

Roughly 4,000 students are expected to attend the 2015 Thescon, and they will be busy.

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A Closer Look
5:50 pm
Wed February 4, 2015

Atlanta's Mary Kay Andrews Reflects On Harper Lee's Upcoming Novel

Atlanta author Mary Kay Andrews (Kathy Trocheck) says Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" influenced her own writing.
Credit Bill Miles

Kathy Hogan Trocheck's byline was a staple in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution in the 1980s. She left the AJC to write fiction full-time in 1991, and has authored a number of best-selling books under the penname "Mary Kay Andrews."

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City Lights
5:41 pm
Tue February 3, 2015

Looking Up: Carlos Unveils New Exhibit 'African Cosmos'

''Untitled'' by South African artist Gavin Jantjes is one of the paintings in the Carlos Museum's new exhibit ''African Cosmos.''
Credit Gabbie Watts / WABE

The Michael C. Carlos Museum has a new exhibit.  “African Cosmos: Stellar Arts” is one in a trilogy of traveling exhibits from the Smithsonian on Africa’s contribution to knowledge.

This exhibit takes a look at “cultural astronomy” on the African continent — how countries scientifically, religiously and culturally interact with the cosmos.

There are over 70 art pieces from traditional to contemporary, and several of the pieces have video and sound elements.

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Arts
11:43 am
Tue February 3, 2015

Second Harper Lee Novel, 'Go Set A Watchman,' To Be Published In July

This March 14, 1963, file photo shows Harper Lee, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, ''To Kill a Mockingbird.'' Publisher Harper announced Feb. 3, 2015, that "Go Set a Watchman," a novel Lee completed in the 1950s and put aside, will be released July 14. It will be her second published book.
Credit File / Associated Press

"To Kill a Mockingbird" will not be Harper Lee's only published book after all.

Publisher Harper announced Tuesday that "Go Set a Watchman," a novel the Pulitzer Prize-winning author completed in the 1950s and put aside, will be released July 14. Rediscovered last fall, "Go Set a Watchman" is essentially a sequel to "To Kill a Mockingbird," although it was finished earlier. The 304-page book will be Lee's second, and the first new work in more than 50 years.

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