Arts

A Closer Look
4:20 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

'Night Of Spectacles' Transforms Old Glasses Into New Fashion

A model strikes a pose in a dress made from recycled eyeglasses by local designer Tyra Hart. Hart's dress was part of the Lighthouse Foundation's annual "Night of Spectacles" fashion show.
Alison Guillory WABE

The Georgia Lions Lighthouse Foundation has made a spectacle of fashion, literally.

The non-profit hosted its annual “Night of Spectacles” fashion show fundraiser over the weekend. The event showcased dresses made by local art students from recycled eyeglasses and helped raise money for a good cause. 

The foundation provides vision and hearing care and eyeglasses for more than 6,000 low-income, uninsured and underinsured residents in Georgia.   

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City Lights
12:00 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

Murders Set In Victorian Dublin No Ordinary Mystery

Victorian-era Dublin is explored in ''A June of Ordinary Murders.''
Credit Gregory Wake / flickr.com/gregwake

Debut novelist Conor Brady applies a journalist’s detail to “A June of Ordinary Murders.”

In this week’s “Mystery Guest” segment on “City Lights,” critic Michele Ross says Brady’s narrative doggedness – he was an editor at The Irish Times – bogs down the story early on, but the dramatic devices he delivers make for a rich, vivid account of Dublin in 1887. 

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City Lights
11:44 am
Mon April 27, 2015

Through Creatives Project In Atlanta, Artists Serve The Community

Neda Abghari (second from left) founded the Creatives Project to link the arts with service. For one of the organization's programs, the CAPTURE project, photographers help students document their communities through photography and interviews. Tabia Parker (left), who coordinates that outreach program, and Abghari are shown with two of the youth participants from the 2014 CAPTURE Old Fourth Ward launch.
Credit Courtesy of the Creatives Project

In the past decade, Atlanta has seen an explosion of arts organizations. BURNAWAY was founded in 2008. MINT Gallery and Whitespace Gallery were both founded in 2006. Dashboard Co-op, Flux Projects and WonderRoot were also founded to fill gaps in Atlanta’s art world.

One organization, the Creatives Project, was founded in 2011. It blends artist residencies with service. Artists receive subsidized housing or free studio space, and in return, they teach art in underserved communities.

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City Lights
2:17 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

‘Mensch-Like’ Jeff Garlin Revisits Comedy Roots In Atlanta

Comedian and TV star Jeff Garlin is appearing at The Improv on Friday and Saturday.
Credit John Russell / Courtesy of Traverse City Comedy Arts Festival

 

If you put Jeff Garlin live in a studio with “City Lights” host Lois Reitzes, add the final day of WABE’s spring pledge drive to the mix and let them improvise, what might you have?

A 25-minute bonanza of laughs with riffs on Jon Stewart, REO Speedwagon, George Wallace the politician, George Wallace the comedian and Mel Brooks.

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City Lights
1:01 pm
Fri April 24, 2015

Artist Nick Cave Brings His Soundsuits To Ponce City Market

Nick Cave's Soundsuits are usually brightly colored and cover the entire body. Other than that, the shapes, patterns and material vary from square to circle, from fur to baskets and from horse heads to stuffed animals.
Credit Photos by James Prinz Photography / Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

In 1992, artist Nick Cave picked up a twig. He then proceeded to collect all the twigs in the park. He brought them to his studio, drilled holes in them and applied them to an understructure.

Initially, this twig mass was supposed to be a sculpture, but when the whole thing was assembled, he realized he could put it on like a suit.

“And the moment I put it on, and I put it in motion,” Cave says, “sound was then generated. So that’s really the origin of the Soundsuit.”

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Arts
10:14 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Jad Abumrad On The 'Hare-Brained Scheme' Of Radiolab

Radiolab co-host Jad Abumrad presents his lecture ''Gut Churn'' at Georgia Tech today at 7 p.m.
Credit Marco Antonio

Jad Abumrad is the creator and co-host of WNYC’s groundbreaking program Radiolab. The show is known for its unconventional, often outlandish production style, mixing interviews and music and sound effects in an effort to explain everything from how the brain processes sound to why cats always land on their feet. Radiolab began on WNYC over a decade ago and WABE’s Myke Johns wanted to know how Abumrad came up with such a unique sound for the show.

Radiolab airs on WABE Sunday evenings at 8pm.

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A Closer Look
4:52 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

Writer Visualizes 'The Art of War' In Charts And Graphs

''The Art of War Visualized'' by author and illustrator Jessica Hagy offers strategy lessons across the centuries.
Alison Guillory WABE

“Visual thinking” has become a buzzword in recent years as knowledge of brain science advances and learning styles are better understood. 

Author and artist Jessica Hagy of Seattle has built her career on visual thinking, earning a Webby award for her imaginative and popular blog Indexed.

Now Hagy is out with a new book called “The Art of War Visualized: The Sun Tzu Classic in Charts and Graphs.”

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City Lights
1:59 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Kids Learn To Save The World At Children’s Museum Of Atlanta

Joshua Perry, 5, plays in a house at the Children’s Museum of Atlanta’s Super Kids Save the World exhibit.
Brenna Beech WABE

Have you ever been so captivated by a book that you wish you could dive right into it? Well, the Super Kids Save the World exhibit at the Children’s Museum of Atlanta lets kids do just that. It’s based on the book "George Saves the World By Lunchtime" by Jo Readman. 

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City Lights
2:37 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

ASO World Premiere Concert Explores ‘What It Means To Create’

Robert Spano, the ASO music director, will be collaborating once again with composer Christopher Theofanidis.
Credit Angela Morris / Atlanta Symphony Orchestra

On Thursday and Saturday, the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus and a host of actors, soloists and other special guests will perform the world premiere of a new piece by Christopher Theofanidis that is no ordinary composition.

"Creation/Creator" is the latest in the ASO’s A Theater of a Concert series, and it blends the auditory and the visual by harmonizing images with a live orchestra performance.

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City Lights
12:56 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Actor Shuler Hensley Honors Ga. Teen Thespians With Namesake Awards

Each year, the Shuler Hensley Awards recognizes the best musical theater performances by Georgia high school students. Tony winner Shuler Hensley always performs with the students during the ceremony.
Credit Courtesy of ArtsBridge Foundation

 

Georgia-native Shuler Hensley won a Tony Award for Broadway’s 2002 revival of "Oklahoma!" and a number of accolades for his role as the Monster in director Mel Brooks' Broadway version of “Young Frankenstein.”

Back when he was just a Georgia boy instead of Broadway star, he went to The Westminster Schools right here in Atlanta. His success story, however, did not cumulate into his flight from Georgia to permanent residence in New York City. Instead, it has turned into supporting the next Georgia generation of musical theater talent.

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A Closer Look
5:26 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Girls Are Loud, Dirty, Messy In Atlanta Photographer’s Series

Kate T. Parker's ''Strong Is The New Pretty'' series: “I was trying to capture them as they were and as they are daily, and a lot of that is messy.”
Courtesy Kate T. Parker

“We love them as they are, loud, dirty, competitive…”

Those words are from Atlanta-based photographer Kate T. Parker about her daughters, who were the inspiration for a photo series called “Strong is the New Pretty.”

The series contains strikingly candid and starkly beautiful images of Parker’s daughters Ella and Alice and their friends.

“I was trying to capture them as they were and as they are daily, and a lot of that is messy,” Parker said on “A Closer Look.”

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City Lights
11:00 am
Fri April 17, 2015

Theater, Theology Meet At Atlanta's Theatrical Outfit

Theatrical Outfit's artistic director Tom Key and author Barbara Brown Taylor discuss the intersection of religion and theater in Theatrical Outfit's performance of ''Storefront Church.''
Credit BreeAnne Clowdus/Don Chambers

Generally, we think about a separation of church and state, but John Patrick Shanley’s “Church and State” trilogy interweaves the church with more secular institutions like the military and commerce. One of the plays in the series is Shanley’s most well-known work, the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Doubt."

Theatrical Outfit is currently performing the last play in the trilogy, "Storefront Church." Instead of a harrowing tale of suspicion and accusation, "Storefront Church" has some laughs but also delves into conversations at the crossroads of spiritual experience and social action.

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Arts
10:59 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Sweetwater 420 Festival Brings Snoop Dogg, 311 To Atlanta

The 11th annual Sweetwater 420 Festival is this weekend at Centennial Olympic Park.
Credit The Zender Agenda / flickr.com/rogerzmusic

The 11th Annual Sweetwater 420 Festival is underway at Centennial Olympic Park this weekend.

Dozens of bands will be performing on three stages.

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City Lights
12:00 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Hilary Hahn Returns To Her Childhood Concertos In New CD

Credit Mark J. Terrill / Associated Press

From the time she learned them as a 10-year-old prodigy, Hilary Hahn has kept two classic concertos in her mind.

Now 35, Hahn has recorded those works – Mozart’s "Violin Concerto No. 5" and  Henri Vieuxtemps’ "Violin Concerto No. 4" – in a CD released last month.

She collaborated with the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen and Paavo Järvi, with whom she has toured and performed for several years.

“I’ve kept playing them all this time,” Hahn said in an interview with “City Lights” host Lois Reitzes. "They've been with me for quite a while now."

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Literature
11:50 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Geocaching Meets Exquisite Corpse: Story Drop Takes Writing To The Streets

A Story Drop notebook waiting to be found...somewhere in Atlanta.
Credit Emily Schreck / Story Drop

Thanks in part to the ubiquity of social media, the age-old game of the scavenger hunt has returned to Atlanta’s streets.

For instance, there is “Free Art Friday,” where local artists offer small versions of their work for free. The work is often dropped along city streets or parks, posted on Twitter or Instagram, and then the hunt is on.

A new participant to this playful art project puts a literary twist on the game by dropping notebooks in hidden spots around the city.

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City Lights
12:00 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Bonaventure Quartet Tunes Up For Atlanta-Area Performances

Why stop at four? The Atlanta-based Bonaventure Quartet often features several performers on its recordings and in concert.
Credit Charles Williams / Bonaventure Quartet

If you like Django Reinhardt, you will love Atlanta’s own Bonaventure Quartet, and you’ll be happy to learn that there are several opportunities to hear the ensemble performing live this spring in places like Inman Park, Decatur, Alpharetta and other locations around Atlanta.

On Tuesday's edition of "City Lights," two members of the Bonaventure Quartet ─ founder, guitarist and composer Charles Williams and Atlanta’s sweetest and sassiest vocalist Amy Pike ─ talked about their inspirations, recordings and upcoming Atlanta performances.

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City Lights
12:00 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

London’s St. Paul’s Choir To Perform In Atlanta At St. Philip

Choir members from St. Paul's Cathedral in London will perform Saturday at the Cathedral of St. Philip in Atlanta.
Credit courtesy of Timothy Gunter

One of the most famous choirs in the world will be bringing its distinct sound to Atlanta this weekend, and taking in some of the city's traditions.

The 40-strong choir of St. Paul's Cathedral, London, will be performing Saturday at the Cathedral of St. Philip. 

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City Lights
11:00 am
Tue April 14, 2015

90-Year-Old Playwright Bolsters Struggling Town In New Film

Jared Callahan's new documentary focuses on his grandmother Janey, who writes plays for her community theater in Rio Vista, California. Callahan interweaves the struggle of putting on a community play with the struggle a small town faces in the aftermath of the recession.
Credit Chadwick Gantes

Compared to a lot of people in Atlanta's forever-expanding film scene, Jared Callahan is a recent addition to Atlanta independent filmmaking. He moved here last year and spent the last few months of 2014 editing his first documentary feature, "Janey Makes A Play," which screened at the Atlanta Film Festival.

The film centers on 90-year-old Janey, who is the playwright and director of the community theater in Rio Vista, California. She is also Callahan's grandmother. 

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City Lights
12:38 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

English Wartime Crime Fiction Offers A Hint Of The Occult

''Language of the Dead'' by Stephen Kelly is set in an English village during World War II.
Credit Gregory Wake / flickr.com/gregwake

As “The Language of the Dead” unfolds, a quiet coastal English village in 1940 is rattled by the discovery of a ritualistically murdered elderly man.

Detective Chief Inspector Thomas Lamb, a British veteran of The Great War, searches for clues against the backdrop of German bombings in World War II.

In this week’s “Mystery Guest” segment, crime fiction critic Michele Ross explains how debut novelist Stephen Kelly makes his story “both reassuring and fresh” even with familiar plotlines.

 

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City Lights
11:00 am
Mon April 13, 2015

On Her 106th Birthday, WABE Celebrates Author Eudora Welty

In memory of Eudora Welty, we celebrate her 106th birthday today. The Pulitzer Prize-winning author penned novels and short stories about the American South from her home in Jackson, Mississippi.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

Instead of cake and ice cream, Eudora Welty might prefer a slice of key lime pie with a side of pimento cheese for her birthday. The great Southern author passed away in 2001 at the age of 92, but we are celebrating her 106th birthday Monday.

Welty lived most of her life in her hometown of Jackson, Mississippi, but she often traveled around the United States to give lectures and to write. Recognized as a great talent, she was on the book reviews staff for the New York Times. Amongst several literary awards, Welty also received the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

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City Lights
10:29 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Cracking The Code On Atlanta's Film Signs

Where there's a little yellow sign, there's a film or TV production underway.
Credit Stephannie Stokes / WABE

You might see them near freeway exits, at the corner of intersections or on the side of streets: little yellow signs with black lettering and an arrow.

These signs are put up by production companies filming all around Atlanta.

But if you’ve paid attention to what’s written on these signs, you’ll know that they don’t just say the name of the movie or TV show being filmed. Instead, they’ll have some seemingly unrelated word or collection of letters and numbers.  

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City Lights
10:14 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Pianist Emanuel Ax, ASO To Play Lesser-Known Mozart Concerto

Pianist Emanuel Ax is playing Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 14 this weekend with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra.
Credit Lisa Marie Mazzucco

In his inexhaustible style, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote 27 piano concertos, a dozen of which he wrote over the course of two years, and world-renowned pianist Emanuel Ax is in Atlanta this weekend playing No. 14.

Ax has toured the world as a soloist and chamber player. He grabbed the world’s attention in the 1970s as a young performer, winning the Arthur Rubinstein International Piano Master Competition and also the Avery Fisher Prize.

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City Lights
4:22 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

Exploring ‘Widow’s Walks’ And More Of Oakland Cemetery Tour

There will be 'widow's walks,' 'anti-monuments' and more on the Cryptophonic tour.
Credit David Goldman / Associated Press

This week on “City Lights,” Atlanta artists with installations in the upcoming Cryptophonic Tour at Oakland Cemetery previewed their work.

Among the artists is Atlanta-area native Grace Thornton, who will step back in time with her own “Widow’s Walk.”

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City Lights
11:00 am
Thu April 9, 2015

20-Year Friendship Inspires New Film On Sickle Cell Anemia

Jaqai Mickelsen, left, and Omar Beach, right, became friends in 1992. In 2012 Mickelsen set out to make a documentary on sickle cell anemia with Beach as the subject. On this 1994 photo, the pair said, ''We have embraced its lameness.''
Credit Courtesy of Jaqai Mickelsen

In 1992 in San Diego, ninth grader Jaqai Mickelsen met 11th grader Omar Beach. They became life-long friends despite the high school age difference.

The normalcy of friendship tomfoolery, however, was often disrupted by a debilitating disease called sickle cell anemia. Beach has spent his life in and out of hospitals because of the disease with Mickelsen mostly as a friendly bystander.

In 2012, Mickelsen had the inspiration to turn Beach's experiences into a film. Specifically, a documentary they are calling "Spilled Milk."

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City Lights
11:24 am
Tue April 7, 2015

Author Robin Oliveira Brings Paris, Love And Art To Atlanta

Author Robin Oliveira's novel ''I Always Loved You'' focuses on the tumultuous relationship between painters Mary Cassatt and Edgar Degas. She says that Degas helped Cassatt find her artistic focus, maternal love. This is Cassatt's 1902 painting ''Mère et enfant.''
Credit Wikimedia Commons

The working title of Robin Oliveira’s recent novel was "I Never Loved You," but when the time came to decide the official release title, she ended up changing it to "I Always Loved You."

The contradicting titles are appropriate, as the novel follows the tumultuous romantic relationship between two prolific artists, Mary Cassatt and Edgar Degas, whose relationship was anything but clear.

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Southern Fashion
7:15 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

Seersucker Before Easter? The Rules Behind Southern Fabric

Not everybody agrees on the hard and fast rule about no seersucker before Easter Sunday.
Credit Kent Wang / flickr.com/kentwang

This weekend you might be tempted to pull out your special striped blazer, but wait just a minute before you do. Apparently, there's a general rule that you're not supposed to wear seersucker – the puckered cotton suits – before the Easter holiday. 

"The conventional thinking is, yes, Easter Sunday would be the first acceptable time to don your white linen and/or seersucker, and it should not be done before then," said Ashton Greene, a salesman at H. Stockon, a traditional clothing store in the Atlanta area. 

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A Closer Look
3:01 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

Maya Angelou Stamp Features Lifelike Image By Atlanta Artist

The Dr. Maya Angelou Forever Stamp, featuring the artwork of Atlanta artist Ross Rossin will have its First-Day-of-Issue on Tue., April 7 in Washington, D.C.
© USPS

The United States Postal Service’s new Forever stamp features the legendary poet and author Maya Angelou.

The man behind the image on the stamp is Atlanta artist Ross Rossin. He has painted world leaders, celebrities, and ordinary people over his decades long career.

Angelou’s image on the stamp, which is so vivid it looks like a photograph, was taken from Rossin’s 2013 oil-on-canvas painting of her. That painting is now part of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery collection.

Rossin spent several days with Angelou in the spring of 2013 before painting her.

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City Lights
12:16 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

Zora Hurston, Alice Walker Ties Explored In Writers Series

Author Zora Neale Hurston, pictured here, and author Alice Walker share a literary heritage as as African-American women of the South.
Credit Carl Van Vechten / Courtesy of the Library of Congress

In 1973, an aspiring but unknown young author visited the remote Florida gravesite of a long-forgotten writer and left a marker with a simple declaration: Genius.

Alice Walker was 28, and in the course of forging her own path to a literary career, she discovered the work of one of the luminaries of the Harlem Renaissance a half-century before.

Zora Neale Hurston died penniless and in obscurity in 1960 ─ her novels and other published works known mostly by her peers.

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City Lights
11:00 am
Fri April 3, 2015

Baritone John Moore Joins Atlanta Opera For 'Marriage Of Figaro'

John Moore will perform as Count Almaviva in Atlanta Opera's ''The Marriage of Figaro,'' starting this Saturday.
Credit Richard Blinkoff

This weekend, the Atlanta Opera begins a four-performance run of Mozart's wildly popular opera, "The Marriage of Figaro." Mozart with librettist Lorenzo Da Ponte adapted the opera from Pierre de Beaumarchais' play of the same name.

It is one of the most-performed operas of all time perhaps because of its relatability. Essentially, it's about a bunch of people with relationship problems. 

At least, that is the argument of baritone John Moore, who will perform as the infamous seducer Count Almaviva.

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Easter Music
10:30 am
Fri April 3, 2015

Atlanta Churches Resurrect Ancient Music For Easter

The Cathedral of St. Philip choir will sing from Psalm 118 from William Byrd this year for Easter.
Credit Courtesy The Cathedral of St. Philip

This weekend’s joyous Easter festivities celebrate Jesus Christ’s resurrection.

The Psalms have held an honored place in such religious services since Jews sang them at the Temple over 2,000 years ago – and Christians later included them in the Bible.  For Easter, many Christians read or sing Psalm 118.  It has lines like: “This is the day that the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.”  This sacred text has seen thousands of years of languages and musical styles, and has outlived almost any other music in human history.

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